Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 116

THE BOSTON TEA PARTY
NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

people groaned under as heavy a tyranny as in the days of Sir Edmund Andros. Boston looked as if it were afflicted with some dreadful pestilence, so sad were the inhabitants, and so desolate the streets. There was no cheerful hum of business. The merchants shut up their warehouses, and the ' laboring men stood idle about the wharves. But all America felt interested in the good town of Boston, and contributions were raised in many places for the relief of the poor inhabitants.
"Our dear old chair!" exclaimed Clara. "How dismal it must have been now!"
" Oh," replied Grandfather, "a gay throng of officers had now come back to the British Coffee-house, so that the old chair had no lack of mirthful company. Soon after General Gage became governor, a great many troops had arrived and were encamped upon the Common. Boston was.now a garrisoned and fortified town, for the general had built a battery across the Neck, on the road to Roxbury, and placed guards for its defense. Everything looked as if a civil war were close at hand.
" Did the people make ready to fight?" asked Charley.
" A Continental Congress assembled at Philadelphia," said Grandfather, "and proposed such measures as they thought most conducive to the public good. A provincial Congress was likewise chosen in Massachusetts. They exhorted the people to arm and discipline themselves. A great number of minutemen were enrolled. The Americans called them minutemen because they engaged to be ready to fight at a minute's warning. The English officers laughed and said that the name was a very proper one, because the minutemen would run away the minute they saw the enemy. Whether they would fight or run was soon to be proved."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE people groaned under as heavy a tyranny as in what is days of Sir Edmund Andros. Boston looked as if it were afflicted with some dreadful pestilence, so sad were what is inhabitants, and so desolate what is streets. There was no cheerful hum of business. what is merchants shut up their warehouses, and what is ' laboring men stood idle about what is wharves. But all America felt interested in what is good town of Boston, and contributions were raised in many places for what is relief of what is poor inhabitants. "Our dear old chair!" exclaimed Clara. "How dismal it must have been now!" " Oh," replied Grandfather, "a gay throng of officers had now come back to what is British Coffee-house, so that what is old chair had no lack of mirthful company. Soon after General Gage became governor, a great many troops had arrived and were encamped upon what is Common. Boston was.now a garrisoned and fortified tow where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 116 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BOSTON TEA PARTY NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE where is p align="justify" people groaned under as heavy a tyranny as in what is days of Sir Edmund Andros. Boston looked as if it were afflicted with some dreadful pestilence, so sad were what is inhabitants, and so desolate what is streets. There was no cheerful hum of business. what is merchants shut up their warehouses, and what is ' laboring men stood idle about what is wharves. But all America felt interested in what is good town of Boston, and contributions were raised in many places for what is relief of what is poor inhabitants. "Our dear old chair!" exclaimed Clara. "How dismal it must have been now!" " Oh," replied Grandfather, "a gay throng of officers had now come back to what is British Coffee-house, so that what is old chair had no lack of mirthful company. Soon after General Gage became governor, a great many troops had arrived and were encamped upon what is Common. Boston was.now a garrisoned and fortified town, for what is general had built a battery across what is Neck, on the road to Roxbury, and placed guards for its defense. Everything looked as if a civil war were close at hand. " Did what is people make ready to fight?" asked Charley. " A Continental Congress assembled at Philadelphia," said Grandfather, "and proposed such measures as they thought most conducive to what is public good. A provincial Congress was likewise chosen in Massachusetts. They exhorted what is people to arm and discipline themselves. A great number of minutemen were enrolled. what is Americans called them minutemen because they engaged to be ready to fight at a minute's warning. what is English officers laughed and said that what is name was a very proper one, because what is minutemen would run away what is minute they saw what is enemy. Whether they would fight or run was soon to be proved." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 318 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364 , 365 , 366 , 367 , 368 , 369 , 370 , 371 , 372 , 373 , 374 , 375 , 376 , 377 , 378 , 379 , 380 , 381 , 382 , 383 , 384 , 385 , 386 , 387 , 388 , 389 , 390 , 391 , 392 , 393 , 394 , 395 , 396 , 397 , 398 , 399 , 400 , 401 , 402 , 403 , 404 , 405 , 406 , 407 , 408 , 409 , 410 , 411 , 412 , 413 , 414 , 415 , 416 , 417 , 418 , 419 , 420 , 421 ,