Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 026

AMERICAN BIGHORN SHEEP

grass, and was smooth for some hundreds of yards. Here I unsaddled, and turned old Manitou loose to drink and feed at his leisure. At the edge of the dark cedar wood I cleared a spot for my bed, and drew a few dead sticks for the fire. Then I lay down and watched drowsily until the afternoon shadows filled the wild and beautiful gorge in which I was camped. This happened early, for the valley was very narrow, and the hills on either hand were steep and high.
Springing to my feet, I climbed the nearest ridge, and then made my way, by hard clambering, from peak to peak and from crest to crest, sometimes crossing and sometimes skirting the deep washouts and canons. When possible, I avoided appearing on the sky line, and I moved with the utmost caution, walking in a wide sweep so as to hunt across and up wind. There was much sheep sign, some of it fresh, though I saw none of the animals themselves; the square slots, with the indented marks of the toe points wide apart, contrasting strongly with the heart-shaped and delicate footprints of deer. The animals had, according to their habit, beaten trails along the summits of the higher crests; little side-trails led to any spur, peak, or other vantage point from which there was a wide outlook over the country roundabout.
The bighorns of the Bad Lands, unlike those of the mountains, shift their range but little, winter or summer. They are marvelous climbers, and dwell by choice always
among cliffs and jagged, broken ground, whether wooded or not. An old bighorn ram is heavier than the largest buck; his huge, curved horns, massive yet supple build, and proud bearing mark him as one of the noblest beasts of the chase. He is wary; great skill and caution must be shown in approaching him; and no one but a good climber, with a steady head, sound lungs, and trained muscles, can successfully

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE grass, and was smooth for some hundreds of yards. Here I unsaddled, and turned old Manitou loose to drink and feed at his leisure. At what is edge of what is dark cedar wood I cleared a spot for my bed, and drew a few dead sticks for what is fire. Then I lay down and watched drowsily until what is afternoon shadows filled what is wild and beautiful gorge in which I was camped. This happened early, for what is valley was very narrow, and what is hills on either hand were steep and high. Springing to my feet, I climbed what is nearest ridge, and then made my way, by hard clambering, from peak to peak and from crest to crest, sometimes crossing and sometimes skirting what is deep washouts and canons. When possible, I avoided appearing on what is sky line, and I moved with what is utmost caution, walking in a wide sweep so as to hunt across and up wind. There was much sheep sign, some of it fresh, though I saw none of what is animals them where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 026 where is p align="center" where is strong AMERICAN BIGHORN SHEEP where is p align="justify" grass, and was smooth for some hundreds of yards. Here I unsaddled, and turned old Manitou loose to drink and feed at his leisure. At what is edge of what is dark cedar wood I cleared a spot for my bed, and drew a few dead sticks for what is fire. Then I lay down and watched drowsily until what is afternoon shadows filled what is wild and beautiful gorge in which I was camped. This happened early, for what is valley was very narrow, and what is hills on either hand were steep and high. Springing to my feet, I climbed what is nearest ridge, and then made my way, by hard clambering, from peak to peak and from crest to crest, sometimes crossing and sometimes skirting what is deep washouts and canons. When possible, I avoided appearing on what is sky line, and I moved with what is utmost caution, walking in a wide sweep so as to hunt across and up wind. There was much sheep sign, some of it fresh, though I saw none of what is animals themselves; what is square slots, with what is indented marks of what is toe points wide apart, contrasting strongly with what is heart-shaped and delicate footprints of deer. what is animals had, according to their habit, beaten trails along what is summits of what is higher crests; little side-trails led to any spur, peak, or other vantage point from which there was a wide outlook over what is country roundabout. what is bighorns of what is Bad Lands, unlike those of what is mountains, shift their range but little, winter or summer. They are marvelous climbers, and dwell by choice always among cliffs and jagged, broken ground, whether wooded or not. An old bighorn ram is heavier than what is largest buck; his huge, curved horns, massive yet supple build, and proud bearing mark him as one of what is noblest beasts of what is chase. He is wary; great s what time is it and caution must be shown in approaching him; and no one but a good climber, with a steady head, sound lungs, and trained muscles, can successfully where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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