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Page 122

CHAPTER XII - DIFFICULTIES

drawn back, leaving them covered only by some thin almost transparent silk of a dainty pattern.
On a long padded stool lay some clothes, and after looking at them for a while with wondering eyes, she recognised them as a tweed walking-costume from her own wardrobe. It was amazing ! Where was she ? Whose room was she in ? Why had she been brought here in this mysterious way ?
It was quite evident that her captor intended to treat her with every consideration-but why had she been taken a prisoner ?
A little gilt clock on the mantelpiece tinkled its silvery notes to announce ten o'clock, and gave her a shock. She must have slept for a long time and very deep ; had not recovered consciousness after her faint, in fact. She hardly knew whether to be alarmed at this or not. She had never fainted before, and she did not know whether it was the normal thing to drift off into sleep after such an attack, or not. A wild thought seized her that she had been drugged. She knew she had not drunk anything-had it been a hypodermic syringe ? Feverishly she searched her arms for signs of a needle prick ; but no ! there was nothing to be seen. Nor did she actually feel as though any foul thing like that had happened to her. Her head was clear and she felt fit enough.
Quickly she slipped off the bed-throwing aside the luxurious eiderdown with which she was covered (another sign of their consideration and care). She could learn something perhaps from these windows. With bated breath she grasped the thin silk curtains and pulled them aside-the windows were thick plate glass all frosted so as to be impenetrable to the eyes.
Her first thought was to break them ; and she wildly looked around for something to smash them withbut there was not a single thing heavy enough. Everything was either too heavy for her to lift, or too light

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE drawn back, leaving them covered only by some thin almost transparent silk of a dainty pattern. On a long padded stool lay some clothes, and after looking at them for a while with wondering eyes, she recognised them as a tweed walking-costume from her own wardrobe. It was amazing ! Where was she ? Whose room was she in ? Why had she been brought here in this mysterious way ? It was quite evident that her captor intended to treat her with every consideration-but why had she been taken a prisoner ? A little gilt clock on what is mantelpiece tinkled its silvery notes to announce ten o'clock, and gave her a shock. She must have slept for a long time and very deep ; had not recovered consciousness after her faint, in fact. She hardly knew whether to be alarmed at this or not. She had never fainted before, and she did not know whether it was what is normal thing to drift off into sleep after such an attack, or not. A wild thought seized her that she had been herb ged. She knew she had not drunk anything-had it been a hypodermic syringe ? Feverishly she searched her arms for signs of a needle prick ; but no ! there was nothing to be seen. Nor did she actually feel as though any foul thing like that had happened to her. Her head was clear and she felt fit enough. Quickly she slipped off what is bed-throwing aside what is luxurious eiderdown with which she was covered (another sign of their consideration and care). She could learn something perhaps from these windows. With bated breath she grasped what is thin silk curtains and pulled them aside-the windows were thick plate glass all frosted so as to be impenetrable to what is eyes. Her first thought was to break them ; and she wildly looked around for something to smash them withbut there was not a single thing heavy enough. Everything was either too heavy for her to lift, or too light where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The fun 's Apprentice where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is strong CHAPTER XII - DIFFICULTIES where is p align="justify" drawn back, leaving them covered only by some thin almost transparent silk of a dainty pattern. On a long padded stool lay some clothes, and after looking at them for a while with wondering eyes, she recognised them as a tweed walking-costume from her own wardrobe. It was amazing ! Where was she ? Whose room was she in ? Why had she been brought here in this mysterious way ? It was quite evident that her captor intended to treat her with every consideration-but why had she been taken a prisoner ? A little gilt clock on what is mantelpiece tinkled its silvery notes to announce ten o'clock, and gave her a shock. She must have slept for a long time and very deep ; had not recovered consciousness after her faint, in fact. She hardly knew whether to be alarmed at this or not. She had never fainted before, and she did not know whether it was what is normal thing to drift off into sleep after such an attack, or not. A wild thought seized her that she had been herb ged. She knew she had not drunk anything-had it been a hypodermic syringe ? Feverishly she searched her arms for signs of a needle prick ; but no ! there was nothing to be seen. Nor did she actually feel as though any foul thing like that had happened to her. Her head was clear and she felt fit enough. Quickly she slipped off what is bed-throwing aside what is luxurious eiderdown with which she was covered (another sign of their consideration and care). She could learn something perhaps from these windows. With bated breath she grasped what is thin silk curtains and pulled them aside-the windows were thick plate glass all frosted so as to be impenetrable to what is eyes. Her first thought was to break them ; and she wildly looked around for something to smash them withbut there was not a single thing heavy enough. Everything was either too heavy for her to lift, or too light where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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