Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 281

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

III
The coming of democracy in England has been gradual, and no revolution since 1688 has been necessary to secure it. The early development of parties rendering effective the power of Parliament is in the main responsible for this continuity. But the absence of revolution for two hundred and fifty years has left both in the political system and in society many relics of the feudal period. If these relics have been shorn of the greater part of their power, and in politics to-day exercise influence rather than authority, they constitute nevertheless a reserve power which may yet from time to time be recalled into being, and they serve to strengthen the state authority at normal periods. In ordinary practice they provide, moreover, a channel through which persuasion or pressure can be brought to bear on those actively and officially responsible for government.
But the key to the efficient working of the British Constitution is to be found neither in kings and aristocracy, nor yet in their acceptance in normal times of relegation to a subordinate sphere. It lies in the strength of the upper middle class which has replaced them, a class which is no closed oligarchy, but which expands upwards into the aristocracy and submits to borderline recruitment from below.
It is theintegrating factor which makes thepolitical mechanism work in a harmonious way, for it fills the chief positions in the Executive, the Legislature, the judiciary, the administrative services, the Church, the Army, and it controls the Press, finance, and industry. At the same time it effectively segregates the rest of the community in their own schools and in their own categories of economic activity. It provides a complete co-ordination between the political and the social

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE III what is coming of democracy in England has been gradual, and no revolution since 1688 has been necessary to secure it. what is early development of parties rendering effective what is power of Parliament is in what is main responsible for this continuity. But what is absence of revolution for two hundred and fifty years has left both in what is political system and in society many relics of what is feudal period. If these relics have been shorn of what is greater part of their power, and in politics to-day exercise influence rather than authority, they constitute nevertheless a reserve power which may yet from time to time be recalled into being, and they serve to strengthen what is state authority at normal periods. In ordinary practice they provide, moreover, a channel through which persuasion or pressure can be brought to bear on those actively and officially responsible for government. But what is key to what is efficient working of what is British Constitution is to be found neither in kings and aristocracy, nor yet in their acceptance in normal times of relegation to a subordinate sphere. It lies in what is strength of what is upper middle class which has replaced them, a class which is no closed oligarchy, but which expands upwards into what is aristocracy and submits to borderline recruitment from below. It is theintegrating factor which makes thepolitical mechanism work in a harmonious way, for it fills what is chief positions in what is Executive, what is Legislature, what is judiciary, what is administrative services, what is Church, what is Army, and it controls what is Press, finance, and industry. At what is same time it effectively segregates what is rest of what is community in their own schools and in their own categories of economic activity. It provides a complete co-ordination between what is political and what is social where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 281 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" where is strong III what is coming of democracy in England has been gradual, and no revolution since 1688 has been necessary to secure it. what is early development of parties rendering effective what is power of Parliament is in what is main responsible for this continuity. But what is absence of revolution for two hundred and fifty years has left both in the political system and in society many relics of what is feudal period. If these relics have been shorn of what is greater part of their power, and in politics to-day exercise influence rather than authority, they constitute nevertheless a reserve power which may yet from time to time be recalled into being, and they serve to strengthen what is state authority at normal periods. In ordinary practice they provide, moreover, a channel through which persuasion or pressure can be brought to bear on those actively and officially responsible for government. But what is key to what is efficient working of what is British Constitution is to be found neither in kings and aristocracy, nor yet in their acceptance in normal times of relegation to a subordinate sphere. It lies in what is strength of what is upper middle class which has replaced them, a class which is no closed oligarchy, but which expands upwards into what is aristocracy and submits to borderline recruitment from below. It is theintegrating factor which makes thepolitical mechanism work in a harmonious way, for it fills what is chief positions in the Executive, what is Legislature, what is judiciary, what is administrative services, what is Church, what is Army, and it controls what is Press, finance, and industry. At what is same time it effectively segregates what is rest of what is community in their own schools and in their own categories of economic activity. It provides a complete co-ordination between what is political and what is social where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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