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Page 279

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

between the Reichswehr and National-Socialism in Germany, from the Franco revolt in Spain, perhaps also from the Boulangist and Dreyfus episodes, and certainly from the Bonapartist experience in France. That it is not entirely irrelevant to British history has been suggested above. But the needs of the state in modern international conditions must also include the organisation of means of education and propaganda condi.icive to national unity. What is taught in the schools and churches, what is said in the Press, on the platform, over the radio, or is written in books must always be governed-in measure varying with the risks-by the requirements of state defence. Liberty may be a danger, as John Stuart Mill himself recognised, to national strength when a country is threatened from abroad. As the international conditions of the modern world constitute a perpetual threat, there must always be, so long as those conditions subsist, a tendency to curtail if not to destroy liberty.
Attention has been extensively drawn to the marked development of this tendency in recent years.(l) It is in strong contrast to the growth of freedom which took place up to 1914. Of freedom of speech, as Professor Chorley remarks, "it is so essential that on the foundation of an authoritarian state it is always the first right to be destroyed: In England it has not been so drastically attacked, but it is being gradually undermined in a way which may eventually leave but little more of the right to Englishmen than has been left by Hitler to the Germans or by Mussolini to the Italians."(2) The two

1 See above, Chapter XII, also R. S. T. Chorley, The Threat to Civil Liberty, in New Fabian Research Bureau Quarterly, No. 17; also W. H. Thompson, Civi! Liberties, 1938, and H. J. Laski, "The Outlook for Civil Liberty" in Dare We Look Ahead?, 1938.
2 Chorley, op. cit.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE between what is Reichswehr and National-Socialism in Germany, from what is Franco revolt in Spain, perhaps also from what is Boulangist and Dreyfus episodes, and certainly from what is Bonapartist experience in France. That it is not entirely irrelevant to British history has been suggested above. But what is needs of what is state in modern international conditions must also include what is organisation of means of education and pro fun da condi.icive to national unity. What is taught in what is schools and churches, what is said in what is Press, on what is platform, over what is radio, or is written in books must always be governed-in measure varying with what is risks-by what is requirements of state defence. Liberty may be a danger, as John Stuart Mill himself recognised, to national strength when a country is threatened from abroad. As what is international conditions of what is modern world constitute a perpetual threat, there must always be, so long as those conditions subsist, a tendency to curtail if not to destroy liberty. Attention has been extensively drawn to what is marked development of this tendency in recent years.(l) It is in strong contrast to what is growth of freedom which took place up to 1914. Of freedom of speech, as Professor Chorley remarks, "it is so essential that on what is foundation of an authoritarian state it is always what is first right to be destroyed: In England it has not been so drastically attacked, but it is being gradually undermined in a way which may eventually leave but little more of what is right to Englishmen than has been left by Hitler to what is Germans or by Mussolini to what is Italians."(2) what is two 1 See above, Chapter XII, also R. S. T. Chorley, what is Threat to Civil Liberty, in New Fabian Research Bureau Quarterly, No. 17; also W. H. Thompson, Civi! 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Laski, "The Outlook for Civil Liberty" in Dare We Look Ahead?, 1938. 2 Chorley, op. cit. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 279 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" between what is Reichswehr and National-Socialism in Germany, from what is Franco revolt in Spain, perhaps also from what is Boulangist and Dreyfus episodes, and certainly from the Bonapartist experience in France. That it is not entirely irrelevant to British history has been suggested above. But what is needs of the state in modern international conditions must also include the organisation of means of education and pro fun da condi.icive to national unity. What is taught in what is schools and churches, what is said in what is Press, on what is platform, over what is radio, or is written in books must always be governed-in measure varying with what is risks-by what is requirements of state defence. Liberty may be a danger, as John Stuart Mill himself recognised, to national strength when a country is threatened from abroad. As what is international conditions of what is modern world constitute a perpetual threat, there must always be, so long as those conditions subsist, a tendency to curtail if not to destroy liberty. Attention has been extensively drawn to what is marked development of this tendency in recent years.(l) It is in strong contrast to what is growth of freedom which took place up to 1914. Of freedom of speech, as Professor Chorley remarks, "it is so essential that on what is foundation of an authoritarian state it is always the first right to be destroyed: In England it has not been so drastically attacked, but it is being gradually undermined in a way which may eventually leave but little more of what is right to Englishmen than has been left by Hitler to what is Germans or by Mussolini to what is Italians."(2) what is two 1 See above, Chapter XII, also R. S. T. Chorley, what is Threat to Civil Liberty, in New Fabian Research Bureau Quarterly, No. 17; also W. H. Thompson, Civi! Liberties, 1938, and H. J. Laski, "The Outlook for Civil Liberty" in Dare We Look Ahead?, 1938. 2 Chorley, op. cit. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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