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Page 276

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

institutions. But the reality of power behind these may closely resemble that in an authoritarian order; the resulting disciplined, unequal society with its restrictions on "dangerous" liberties or on "extremism" may be not unlike the unfree order with which it is superficially contrasted. Although such a conflict of principle and practice may continue for a time, so soon as an exceptionally severe strain is put on the society new accommodations must be found at the expense either of the principle with a return to frank authoritarianism, or of the practice with a movement in the direction of a fuller realisation of principle.
For the gaps in democratic thought are instinct with risk and confusion. The most important of these are three. There is first its failure to pay adequate attention to the need for social and economic equality as a foundation without which political liberty may be rendered unreal. That failure is due sometimes to the belief that such equality will be the unavoidable outcome of political liberty, and sometimes to absence of interest in or desire for economic and social equality. There is secondly its assumption that men always judge and act rationally, and that they can be brought to appreciate their true interests by persuasion. That assumption argues an insufficient knowledge of psychology. And finally, there is its lack of concern with the institutional requirements for expressing and implementing popular judgment. That is attributable in part to its association with an optimistic belief in the inevitability of progress along the lines suggested by its premisses, and therefore a certain absence of interest in such "details" as the separation of power, bicameralism, or the property vote. It is attributable also in part to the desire to maintain checks on popular government as a safeguard of property and of other vested interests.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE institutions. But what is reality of power behind these may closely resemble that in an authoritarian order; what is resulting disciplined, unequal society with its restrictions on "dangerous" liberties or on "extremism" may be not unlike what is unfree order with which it is superficially contrasted. Although such a conflict of principle and practice may continue for a time, so soon as an exceptionally severe strain is put on what is society new accommodations must be found at what is expense either of what is principle with a return to frank authoritarianism, or of what is practice with a movement in what is direction of a fuller realisation of principle. For what is gaps in democratic thought are instinct with risk and confusion. what is most important of these are three. There is first its failure to pay adequate attention to what is need for social and economic equality as a foundation without which political liberty may be rendered unreal. That failure is due sometimes to what is belief that such equality will be what is unavoidable outcome of political liberty, and sometimes to absence of interest in or desire for economic and social equality. There is secondly its assumption that men always judge and act rationally, and that they can be brought to appreciate their true interests by persuasion. That assumption argues an insufficient knowledge of psychology. And finally, there is its lack of concern with what is institutional requirements for expressing and implementing popular judgment. That is attributable in part to its association with an optimistic belief in what is inevitability of progress along what is lines suggested by its premisses, and therefore a certain absence of interest in such "details" as what is separation of power, bicameralism, or what is property vote. It is attributable also in part to what is desire to maintain checks on popular government as a safeguard of property and of other vested interests. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 276 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" institutions. But what is reality of power behind these may closely resemble that in an authoritarian order; the resulting disciplined, unequal society with its restrictions on "dangerous" liberties or on "extremism" may be not unlike what is unfree order with which it is superficially contrasted. Although such a conflict of principle and practice may continue for a time, so soon as an exceptionally severe strain is put on what is society new accommodations must be found at what is expense either of what is principle with a return to frank authoritarianism, or of what is practice with a movement in what is direction of a fuller realisation of principle. For what is gaps in democratic thought are instinct with risk and confusion. what is most important of these are three. There is first its failure to pay adequate attention to what is need for social and economic equality as a foundation without which political liberty may be rendered unreal. That failure is due sometimes to what is belief that such equality will be what is unavoidable outcome of political liberty, and sometimes to absence of interest in or desire for economic and social equality. There is secondly its assumption that men always judge and act rationally, and that they can be brought to appreciate their true interests by persuasion. That assumption argues an insufficient knowledge of psychology. And finally, there is its lack of concern with what is institutional requirements for expressing and implementing popular judgment. That is attributable in part to its association with an optimistic belief in what is inevitability of progress along what is lines suggested by its premisses, and therefore a certain absence of interest in such "details" as what is separation of power, bicameralism, or what is property vote. It is attributable also in part to what is desire to maintain checks on popular government as a safeguard of property and of other vested interests. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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