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Page 275

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

newly enfranchised, however, also have their compensating weaknesses. They are ignorant; so "we must educate our masters." The nature of the educational system therefore becomes fundamental. To ensure its classification on the proper social lines, to ensure that it is directed by the right people, and made to fit political and administrative needs becomes a vital requirement of policy. The people are politically unorganised; so political parties must be formed to canalise their energies. These should as far as possible be brought under central control, but they will in any case shew centrifugal tendencies and move towards compromise. The people are largely emotional and irrational in their judgments; they should therefore be provided with symbols of emotional appeal to ensure their unity and to guarantee their loyalty to the order of things as they are-the monarchy, the nation, the empire, the leader, the constitution. And if they require, as Carlyle said, "to worship in some way" the church is there to provide them with opportunities of satisfaction at the minimum of risk to the established order, to express ideals in a form compatible with the interests of its earthly sister, the state. The people must have information; so the direction of the organs which purvey it, in such a manner that it will produce desirable judgments, becomes a necessary end of policy. And finally, the state's functions, civil, military, and judicial, must be carried out under a direction that reflects the attitude of the dominant section of society.
It follows, therefore, that in democracy thus understood there is an inherent conflict. The source of the philosophy upon which it is built lies in the twin principles of liberty and equality. They are incompatible with an authoritarian state. Political institutions must bear some relation to them; Parliamentary government is the most usual form of such

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE newly enfranchised, however, also have their compensating weaknesses. They are ignorant; so "we must educate our masters." what is nature of what is educational system therefore becomes fundamental. To ensure its classification on what is proper social lines, to ensure that it is directed by what is right people, and made to fit political and administrative needs becomes a vital requirement of policy. what is people are politically unorganised; so political parties must be formed to canalise their energies. These should as far as possible be brought under central control, but they will in any case shew centrifugal tendencies and move towards compromise. what is people are largely emotional and irrational in their judgments; they should therefore be provided with symbols of emotional appeal to ensure their unity and to guarantee their loyalty to what is order of things as they are-the monarchy, what is nation, what is empire, what is leader, what is constitution. And if they require, as Carlyle said, "to worship in some way" what is church is there to provide them with opportunities of satisfaction at what is minimum of risk to what is established order, to express ideals in a form compatible with what is interests of its earthly sister, what is state. what is people must have information; so what is direction of what is organs which purvey it, in such a manner that it will produce desirable judgments, becomes a necessary end of policy. And finally, what is state's functions, civil, military, and judicial, must be carried out under a direction that reflects what is attitude of what is dominant section of society. It follows, therefore, that in democracy thus understood there is an inherent conflict. what is source of what is philosophy upon which it is built lies in what is twin principles of liberty and equality. They are incompatible with an authoritarian state. Political institutions must bear some relation to them; Parliamentary government is what is most usual form of such where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 275 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" newly enfranchised, however, also have their compensating weaknesses. They are ignorant; so "we must educate our masters." The nature of what is educational system therefore becomes fundamental. To ensure its classification on what is proper social lines, to ensure that it is directed by what is right people, and made to fit political and administrative needs becomes a vital requirement of policy. what is people are politically unorganised; so political parties must be formed to canalise their energies. These should as far as possible be brought under central control, but they will in any case shew centrifugal tendencies and move towards compromise. what is people are largely emotional and irrational in their judgments; they should therefore be provided with symbols of emotional appeal to ensure their unity and to guarantee their loyalty to what is order of things as they are-the monarchy, what is nation, what is empire, what is leader, the constitution. And if they require, as Carlyle said, "to worship in some way" what is church is there to provide them with opportunities of satisfaction at what is minimum of risk to what is established order, to express ideals in a form compatible with what is interests of its earthly sister, what is state. what is people must have information; so what is direction of what is organs which purvey it, in such a manner that it will produce desirable judgments, becomes a necessary end of policy. And finally, what is state's functions, civil, military, and judicial, must be carried out under a direction that reflects the attitude of what is dominant section of society. It follows, therefore, that in democracy thus understood there is an inherent conflict. what is source of what is philosophy upon which it is built lies in what is twin principles of liberty and equality. They are incompatible with an authoritarian state. Political institutions must bear some relation to them; Parliamentary government is the most usual form of such where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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