Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 274

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

It cannot, like kings, assert a divine right to command. Nor has it the traditional leadership of a leisured and cultured aristocracy. It proclaims, therefore, that divinity is revealed through the inner light of individual conscience, and that true aristocracy is government by those who have proved themselves to be the best in a competitive struggle based on equal opportunities. Forced by circumstances to enter into a covenant with egalitarianism, it has no desire nevertheless for unfettered control by a popular majority. Immediately it is faced with this danger it gravitates instead towards alliance with the governing class it has replaced. It discovers that divinity in the people requires to be checked by balances in the mechanics of power. The King is retained, if he is willing to remain normally inactive, both as a useful emergency check on popular sovereignty and as a buttress of the newer order. Or, failing an acceptance of this role, there is a president to undertake it. The nobility are retained on similar terms and forsimilar reasons; but being more powerful and being also more susceptible of penetration by the newer forms of wealth, they are allowed a more active share in government. If, however, they claim too much or are too exclusive they are weakened, or replaced by a Senate. And then, thirdly, there gradually grows upon the consciousness of the new rulers a realisation that wealth itself is power, and that behind the forms of representative governmenteven of an extending representative government-a real, non-popular dominance can for long be maintained.
But the acceptance of an egalitarian principle as the ultimate foundation of authority is a source of weakness. Hostages have been given to the common man. It means that new acknowledgments of popular sovereignty must be made in the shape of a widening franchise and of social services. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It cannot, like kings, assert a divine right to command. Nor has it what is traditional leadership of a leisured and cultured aristocracy. It proclaims, therefore, that divinity is revealed through what is inner light of individual conscience, and that true aristocracy is government by those who have proved themselves to be what is best in a competitive struggle based on equal opportunities. Forced by circumstances to enter into a covenant with egalitarianism, it has no desire nevertheless for unfettered control by a popular majority. Immediately it is faced with this danger it gravitates instead towards alliance with what is governing class it has replaced. It discovers that divinity in what is people requires to be checked by balances in what is mechanics of power. what is King is retained, if he is willing to remain normally inactive, both as a useful emergency check on popular sovereignty and as a buttress of what is newer order. Or, failing an acceptance of this role, there is a president to undertake it. what is nobility are retained on similar terms and forsimilar reasons; but being more powerful and being also more susceptible of penetration by what is newer forms of wealth, they are allowed a more active share in government. If, however, they claim too much or are too exclusive they are weakened, or replaced by a Senate. And then, thirdly, there gradually grows upon what is consciousness of what is new rulers a realisation that wealth itself is power, and that behind what is forms of representative governmenteven of an extending representative government-a real, non-popular dominance can for long be maintained. But what is acceptance of an egalitarian principle as what is ultimate foundation of authority is a source of weakness. Hostages have been given to what is common man. It means that new acknowledgments of popular sovereignty must be made in what is shape of a widening franchise and of social services. what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 274 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" It cannot, like kings, assert a divine right to command. Nor has it what is traditional leadership of a leisured and cultured aristocracy. It proclaims, therefore, that divinity is revealed through what is inner light of individual conscience, and that true aristocracy is government by those who have proved themselves to be what is best in a competitive struggle based on equal opportunities. Forced by circumstances to enter into a covenant with egalitarianism, it has no desire nevertheless for unfettered control by a popular majority. Immediately it is faced with this danger it gravitates instead towards alliance with what is governing class it has replaced. It discovers that divinity in what is people requires to be checked by balances in what is mechanics of power. what is King is retained, if he is willing to remain normally inactive, both as a useful emergency check on popular sovereignty and as a buttress of what is newer order. Or, failing an acceptance of this role, there is a president to undertake it. what is nobility are retained on similar terms and forsimilar reasons; but being more powerful and being also more susceptible of penetration by what is newer forms of wealth, they are allowed a more active share in government. If, however, they claim too much or are too exclusive they are weakened, or replaced by a Senate. And then, thirdly, there gradually grows upon what is consciousness of what is new rulers a realisation that wealth itself is power, and that behind what is forms of representative governmenteven of an extending representative government-a real, non-popular dominance can for long be maintained. But what is acceptance of an egalitarian principle as what is ultimate foundation of authority is a source of weakness. Hostages have been given to what is common man. It means that new acknowledgments of popular sovereignty must be made in what is shape of a widening franchise and of social services. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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