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Page 273

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

the prerequisites. A working-man is often less interested in the right to associate and to form a trade union than in the enjoyment of the standard of living to the attainment of which the trade union is merely a means; if he can get the end without the means-or by an alternative method-then so much the worse for the means. The interest of the trade union official in preserving the trade. union must not be mistaken for the interest of the trade union member in achieving the purposes which the union was formed to serve. It may be that freedom of association in particular, and freedom of the mind in general, is essential to the dignity and self-respect of the individual. It does not follow that no one who has once realised this will be content to forgo it, particularly if economic circumstances have in fact precluded him from fully realising it. He may suffer from a sense of frustration which will render him an easy victim of emotional appeal, and that emotional appeal may still further strengthen his rational suspicion that these liberties do not much affect himself.
Democracy, indeed, can only be understood in modern times in its historical context and by relation to the period which gave it birth. It is a revolt against the claims of hereditary privilege to the sole exercise of power. It is a reaction to the evils of government by, and in the interests of, a royal court and a feudal nobility. Expressing the demands of industry and the middleman against the landed aristocracy, it represents an alliance between the merchant class and religious protestantism. Democracy is contemporary with the growth of capitalism.
This new class, however, whose social significance is based on capital investment and not on the ownership of land, has none of the claims to authority of those whom it supplants.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the prerequisites. A working-man is often less interested in what is right to associate and to form a trade union than in what is enjoyment of what is standard of living to what is attainment of which what is trade union is merely a means; if he can get what is end without what is means-or by an alternative method-then so much what is worse for what is means. what is interest of what is trade union official in preserving what is trade. union must not be mistaken for what is interest of what is trade union member in achieving what is purposes which what is union was formed to serve. It may be that freedom of association in particular, and freedom of what is mind in general, is essential to what is dignity and self-respect of what is individual. It does not follow that no one who has once realised this will be content to forgo it, particularly if economic circumstances have in fact precluded him from fully realising it. He may suffer from a sense of frustration which will render him an easy victim of emotional appeal, and that emotional appeal may still further strengthen his rational suspicion that these liberties do not much affect himself. Democracy, indeed, can only be understood in modern times in its historical context and by relation to what is period which gave it birth. It is a revolt against what is claims of hereditary privilege to what is sole exercise of power. It is a reaction to what is evils of government by, and in what is interests of, a royal court and a feudal nobility. Expressing what is demands of industry and what is middleman against what is landed aristocracy, it represents an alliance between what is merchant class and religious protestantism. Democracy is contemporary with what is growth of capitalism. This new class, however, whose social significance is based on capital investment and not on what is ownership of land, has none of what is claims to authority of those whom it supplants. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 273 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" the prerequisites. A working-man is often less interested in what is right to associate and to form a trade union than in what is enjoyment of what is standard of living to what is attainment of which what is trade union is merely a means; if he can get what is end without what is means-or by an alternative method-then so much the worse for what is means. what is interest of what is trade union official in preserving what is trade. union must not be mistaken for what is interest of what is trade union member in achieving what is purposes which what is union was formed to serve. It may be that freedom of association in particular, and freedom of what is mind in general, is essential to what is dignity and self-respect of what is individual. It does not follow that no one who has once realised this will be content to forgo it, particularly if economic circumstances have in fact precluded him from fully realising it. He may suffer from a sense of frustration which will render him an easy victim of emotional appeal, and that emotional appeal may still further strengthen his rational suspicion that these liberties do not much affect himself. Democracy, indeed, can only be understood in modern times in its historical context and by relation to what is period which gave it birth. It is a revolt against what is claims of hereditary privilege to what is sole exercise of power. It is a reaction to what is evils of government by, and in what is interests of, a royal court and a feudal nobility. Expressing what is demands of industry and what is middleman against what is landed aristocracy, it represents an alliance between what is merchant class and religious protestantism. Democracy is contemporary with what is growth of capitalism. This new class, however, whose social significance is based on capital investment and not on what is ownership of land, has none of what is claims to authority of those whom it supplants. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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