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Page 272

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

of representative government grounded in inequality, it certainly does not suggest that all the virtue is on one side.
For when we are considering government in a particular State, we need above all to know where the real source of decision most often lies; we have to go behind the machinery. If we are comparing two countries and find that the sources of decision in them are broadly the same then, although one may work through a libertarian system and another through an authoritarian system, we know that they will reveal many common features and pursue many common courses of action. Nor does it suffice to enquire whether "public opinion" or "the people" determine government policy for, as we have seen, public opinion may mean several things and be created or expressed in several ways, and as for the people, they are a limiting factor in some measure in all forms of government: there are always areas upon which a government dare not venture. We may more usefully attempt to discover the extent of the influence of certain sections of public opinion and the speed with which it operates.
We need also to know what liberties are secured. It is not enough to consider Lhose liberties which seem important to a middle-class intellectual, to read and write and speak and vote and join in certain hallowed emotional pleasures. If we attach too much importance to these, relatively to such other more mundane prerequisites as the mere freedom to exist, to work, to have food, shelter, leisure, economic security, careers open to talent, those who lack the prerequisites will have less concern for the more intellectual freedoms. They may even turn in welcome to an alternative system which despises the middle-class intellectual, and while denying liberty of the mind gives some hope of securing

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of representative government grounded in inequality, it certainly does not suggest that all what is virtue is on one side. For when we are considering government in a particular State, we need above all to know where what is real source of decision most often lies; we have to go behind what is machinery. If we are comparing two countries and find that what is sources of decision in them are broadly what is same then, although one may work through a libertarian system and another through an authoritarian system, we know that they will reveal many common features and pursue many common courses of action. Nor does it suffice to enquire whether "public opinion" or "the people" determine government policy for, as we have seen, public opinion may mean several things and be created or expressed in several ways, and as for what is people, they are a limiting factor in some measure in all forms of government: there are always areas upon which a government dare not venture. We may more usefully attempt to discover what is extent of what is influence of certain sections of public opinion and what is speed with which it operates. We need also to know what liberties are secured. It is not enough to consider Lhose liberties which seem important to a middle-class intellectual, to read and write and speak and vote and join in certain hallowed emotional pleasures. If we attach too much importance to these, relatively to such other more mundane prerequisites as what is mere freedom to exist, to work, to have food, shelter, leisure, economic security, careers open to talent, those who lack what is prerequisites will have less concern for what is more intellectual freedoms. They may even turn in welcome to an alternative system which despises what is middle-class intellectual, and while denying liberty of what is mind gives some hope of securing where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" of representative government grounded in inequality, it certainly does not suggest that all what is virtue is on one side. For when we are considering government in a particular State, we need above all to know where what is real source of decision most often lies; we have to go behind what is machinery. If we are comparing two countries and find that what is sources of decision in them are broadly what is same then, although one may work through a libertarian system and another through an authoritarian system, we know that they will reveal many common features and pursue many common courses of action. Nor does it suffice to enquire whether "public opinion" or "the people" determine government policy for, as we have seen, public opinion may mean several things and be created or expressed in several ways, and as for what is people, they are a limiting factor in some measure in all forms of government: there are always areas upon which a government dare not venture. We may more usefully attempt to discover what is extent of what is influence of certain sections of public opinion and what is speed with which it operates. We need also to know what liberties are secured. It is not enough to consider Lhose liberties which seem important to a middle-class intellectual, to read and write and speak and vote and join in certain hallowed emotional pleasures. If we attach too much importance to these, relatively to such other more mundane prerequisites as what is mere freedom to exist, to work, to have food, shelter, leisure, economic security, careers open to talent, those who lack what is prerequisites will have less concern for what is more intellectual freedoms. They may even turn in welcome to an alternative system which despises what is middle-class intellectual, and while denying liberty of the mind gives some hope of securing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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