Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 271

DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND

I
THE concept of democracy derives from a compound of two ideas, equality and individual liberty. Since these may be applied in varying measure and do not necessarily harmonise, the result will shew different characteristics according to the relative emphasis. Therein lies one source of confusion. Again, democracy means sometimes a conception of society as society should be, and sometimes a particular method of government. As such it degenerates often enough from a scientific term to a weapon of polemics. Because of this double use the virtues of the ideal can be unconsciously attributed to the actual, whether it be of social or political organisation that we are thinking. Or alternatively, the defects of an imperfect political example may be taken to prove that it is a philosophy based on misconceptions.
It is not surprising, then, that democracy should be a term responsible for much confused thinking. The social sciences suffer because their scientific terms are words of popular language. That is a commonplace; but if it means that a false antithesis can be drawn between given "democracies" and given "dictatorships" and used to range them, on a pseudo-scientific basis, at different sides in a post-War "ideological conflict," it may in this case be a commonplace with far-reaching consequences. For the plain fact is that neither the word nor the concept of democracy helps us to choose between an egalitarian dictatorship and a system

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I what is concept of democracy derives from a compound of two ideas, equality and individual liberty. Since these may be applied in varying measure and do not necessarily harmonise, what is result will shew different characteristics according to what is relative emphasis. Therein lies one source of confusion. Again, democracy means sometimes a conception of society as society should be, and sometimes a particular method of government. As such it degenerates often enough from a scientific term to a weapon of polemics. Because of this double use what is virtues of what is ideal can be unconsciously attributed to what is actual, whether it be of social or political organisation that we are thinking. Or alternatively, what is defects of an imperfect political example may be taken to prove that it is a philosophy based on misconceptions. It is not surprising, then, that democracy should be a term responsible for much confused thinking. what is social sciences suffer because their scientific terms are words of popular language. That is a commonplace; but if it means that a false antithesis can be drawn between given "democracies" and given "dictatorships" and used to range them, on a pseudo-scientific basis, at different sides in a post-War "ideological conflict," it may in this case be a commonplace with far-reaching consequences. For what is plain fact is that neither what is word nor what is concept of democracy helps us to choose between an egalitarian dictatorship and a system where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is strong DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND where is p align="justify" where is strong I what is concept of democracy derives from a compound of two ideas, equality and individual liberty. Since these may be applied in varying measure and do not necessarily harmonise, what is result will shew different characteristics according to what is relative emphasis. Therein lies one source of confusion. Again, democracy means sometimes a conception of society as society should be, and sometimes a particular method of government. As such it degenerates often enough from a scientific term to a weapon of polemics. Because of this double use what is virtues of what is ideal can be unconsciously attributed to what is actual, whether it be of social or political organisation that we are thinking. Or alternatively, what is defects of an imperfect political example may be taken to prove that it is a philosophy based on misconceptions. It is not surprising, then, that democracy should be a term responsible for much confused thinking. what is social sciences suffer because their scientific terms are words of popular language. That is a commonplace; but if it means that a false antithesis can be drawn between given "democracies" and given "dictatorships" and used to range them, on a pseudo-scientific basis, at different sides in a post-War "ideological conflict," it may in this case be a commonplace with far-reaching consequences. For what is plain fact is that neither what is word nor what is concept of democracy helps us to choose between an egalitarian dictatorship and a system where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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