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Page 270

PUBLIC OPINION

propaganda on the London news-screen-fleet movements, recruiting, air manceuvres, etc.-and anything which could be called even mildly internationalist.
We have now seen some of the factors which determine public opinion. It is this public opinion which, we are told, ought to govern political affairs in a democracy. Indeed, that it does so is said to be the distinguishing feature of democracy. It is not necessary to repeat that often enough it is not united or firm enough to force the hand of a government determined to withstand it. When those who chiefly direct it are in general agreement with the Government of the day it does not present any serious difficulties, so does not need to be emphasised. Then, indeed, these factors become admirable instruments of government themselves, aimed at maintaining the social order of which they are both an expression and a defence. It does not by any means follow that the opinion which is uttered at such times is the only possible public opinion. But the really interesting moment comes when these factors determining it, or an important section of them, are hostile to the government of the day, and opposed to its most fundamental purposes. For then democracy may witness the use of these factors to discredit its political machinery and the men to whom it has given the duty and the right of control. In such an event the Government may even be overthrown, not by the normal political process, but by the conjunction of these factors with their allies among big business and high finance. This has occurred in France and elsewhere. It is not without relevance to the hap penings in Britain in the political crisis of 1931. If we are to cite it as another example of "the control of political affairs by public opinion," then we must know quite clearly what we mean by public opinion and how essentially unpublic it can be.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pro fun da on what is London news-screen-fleet movements, recruiting, air manceuvres, etc.-and anything which could be called even mildly internationalist. We have now seen some of what is factors which determine public opinion. It is this public opinion which, we are told, ought to govern political affairs in a democracy. Indeed, that it does so is said to be what is distinguishing feature of democracy. It is not necessary to repeat that often enough it is not united or firm enough to force what is hand of a government determined to withstand it. When those who chiefly direct it are in general agreement with what is Government of what is day it does not present any serious difficulties, so does not need to be emphasised. Then, indeed, these factors become admirable instruments of government themselves, aimed at maintaining what is social order of which they are both an expression and a defence. It does not by any means follow that what is opinion which is uttered at such times is what is only possible public opinion. But what is really interesting moment comes when these factors determining it, or an important section of them, are hostile to what is government of what is day, and opposed to its most fundamental purposes. For then democracy may witness what is use of these factors to discredit its political machinery and what is men to whom it has given what is duty and what is right of control. In such an event what is Government may even be overthrown, not by what is normal political process, but by what is conjunction of these factors with their allies among big business and high finance. This has occurred in France and elsewhere. It is not without relevance to what is hap penings in Britain in what is political crisis of 1931. If we are to cite it as another example of "the control of political affairs by public opinion," then we must know quite clearly what we mean by public opinion and how essentially unpublic it can be. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 270 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" pro fun da on what is London news-screen-fleet movements, recruiting, air manceuvres, etc.-and anything which could be called even mildly internationalist. We have now seen some of what is factors which determine public opinion. It is this public opinion which, we are told, ought to govern political affairs in a democracy. Indeed, that it does so is said to be the distinguishing feature of democracy. It is not necessary to repeat that often enough it is not united or firm enough to force the hand of a government determined to withstand it. When those who chiefly direct it are in general agreement with what is Government of what is day it does not present any serious difficulties, so does not need to be emphasised. Then, indeed, these factors become admirable instruments of government themselves, aimed at maintaining the social order of which they are both an expression and a defence. It does not by any means follow that what is opinion which is uttered at such times is what is only possible public opinion. But what is really interesting moment comes when these factors determining it, or an important section of them, are hostile to what is government of what is day, and opposed to its most fundamental purposes. For then democracy may witness what is use of these factors to discredit its political machinery and what is men to whom it has given what is duty and what is right of control. In such an event what is Government may even be overthrown, not by what is normal political process, but by the conjunction of these factors with their allies among big business and high finance. This has occurred in France and elsewhere. It is not without relevance to what is hap penings in Britain in what is political crisis of 1931. If we are to cite it as another example of "the control of political affairs by public opinion," then we must know quite clearly what we mean by public opinion and how essentially unpublic it can be. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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