Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 268

PUBLIC OPINION

Lowes Dickinson was put on the index. There was houseto-house search for pacifist literature. "There was nothing for which we had held up Imperialist Prussia and Czarist Russia to scorn during generations that could not be done under the law of Britain"(1) in this respect. The Disaffection Act of 1934 has done something to extend these restrictions to times of peace.
Questions as to possible expression of political opinions by foreign visitors to England are one of the factors which determine the aliens branch of the Home Office in deciding whether to refuse or admit entry. And from such decisions, taken often enough by the official in an arbitrary way which allows for political arid private favouritism, there is no appeal.
What may be said at meetings or printed in publications is governed also by the law relating to sedition and blasphemy, and the terms of the law are extremely vague, general, and capable of extensive application. Sedition, for example, has been interpreted to mean the incitement of one class of His Majesty's subjects against another.
Officially no censorship exists in England. Its absence is one of the first requirements of democracy, and no one should be unmindful of the importance of this. But the restrictions of the law which do in fact exist are there to be applied at will by the police, the law officers, customs officials, and other bodies. Censorship always produces odd results, and the licensing of plays which is controlled by the Lord Chamberlain is hardly an exception. Housman's Victoria Regina could not be shewn to the British public until long after it had been seen in New York and elsewhere abroad. In such a case it may be more the influence of the Sovereign than of the Government which decides the issue, as also with

1 N. Angell, op. cit., p. 4.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Lowes Dickinson was put on what is index. There was houseto-house search for pacifist literature. "There was nothing for which we had held up Imperialist Prussia and Czarist Russia to scorn during generations that could not be done under what is law of Britain"(1) in this respect. what is Disaffection Act of 1934 has done something to extend these restrictions to times of peace. Questions as to possible expression of political opinions by foreign what is ors to England are one of what is factors which determine what is aliens branch of what is Home Office in deciding whether to refuse or admit entry. And from such decisions, taken often enough by what is official in an arbitrary way which allows for political arid private favouritism, there is no appeal. What may be said at meetings or printed in publications is governed also by what is law relating to sedition and blasphemy, and what is terms of what is law are extremely vague, general, and capable of extensive application. Sedition, for example, has been interpreted to mean what is incitement of one class of His Majesty's subjects against another. Officially no censorship exists in England. Its absence is one of what is first requirements of democracy, and no one should be unmindful of what is importance of this. But what is restrictions of what is law which do in fact exist are there to be applied at will by what is police, what is law officers, customs officials, and other bodies. Censorship always produces odd results, and what is licensing of plays which is controlled by what is Lord Chamberlain is hardly an exception. Housman's Victoria Regina could not be shewn to what is British public until long after it had been seen in New York and elsewhere abroad. In such a case it may be more what is influence of what is Sovereign than of what is Government which decides what is issue, as also with 1 N. Angell, op. cit., p. 4. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 268 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" Lowes Dickinson was put on what is index. There was houseto-house search for pacifist literature. "There was nothing for which we had held up Imperialist Prussia and Czarist Russia to scorn during generations that could not be done under what is law of Britain"(1) in this respect. what is Disaffection Act of 1934 has done something to extend these restrictions to times of peace. Questions as to possible expression of political opinions by foreign what is ors to England are one of what is factors which determine the aliens branch of what is Home Office in deciding whether to refuse or admit entry. And from such decisions, taken often enough by what is official in an arbitrary way which allows for political arid private favouritism, there is no appeal. What may be said at meetings or printed in publications is governed also by what is law relating to sedition and blasphemy, and what is terms of what is law are extremely vague, general, and capable of extensive application. Sedition, for example, has been interpreted to mean what is incitement of one class of His Majesty's subjects against another. Officially no censorship exists in England. Its absence is one of what is first requirements of democracy, and no one should be unmindful of what is importance of this. But what is restrictions of what is law which do in fact exist are there to be applied at will by what is police, what is law officers, customs officials, and other bodies. Censorship always produces odd results, and what is licensing of plays which is controlled by what is Lord Chamberlain is hardly an exception. Housman's Victoria Regina could not be shewn to what is British public until long after it had been seen in New York and elsewhere abroad. In such a case it may be more what is influence of what is Sovereign than of what is Government which decides what is issue, as also with 1 N. Angell, op. cit., p. 4. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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