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Page 267

PUBLIC OPINION

be taken to apply to it. "The plain truth is," as the Economist remarked in a leading article, "that judges and juries with their fantastic attitude to libel are setting up a new censorship which, if developed, will kill that freedom of discussion which is vital to democracy. The law is intended to protect men from genuine defamation of character. It is being used to shelter them from criticism."(1)
The Official Secrets Act was passed as a straightforward measure to deal with spying. For that it is a necessary part of the national system of defence. But there are cases in which it seems to have operated to prevent the publication of material which is desirable for the due public discussion of public affairs, and as a screen for the bureaucrat. It has been used against two members of the Government of 1929-31 to prevent in the one case publication of a document by its author, and in the other the reporting of a speech. In the Commons debate of December 15, 1937, on the subject of civil liberty, Mr. Weir remarked, after citing certain instances, that "if an author set out to write a history of contemporary politics he would find that he was on a very perilous adventure. The Official Secrets Act would be cited against him, and the law of libel used against him; he would be threatened with blackmail and his publisher would also be involved." The limitations set to the pacifist, Christian or otherwise, in the expression of his opinions in war-time is a well-known aspect of the operating of the Defence of the Realm Act. Mr. Bertrand Russell was prosecuted not for revealing secrets, but for saying what he thought, and several men were imprisoned for disseminating his views.(2) Even Mr.

1 May 2, 1935.
2 Rex v. Berrrand kussell, Report of the proceedings before the
Lord Mayor, June 5, 1916.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE be taken to apply to it. "The plain truth is," as what is Economist remarked in a leading article, "that judges and juries with their fantastic attitude to libel are setting up a new censorship which, if developed, will stop that freedom of discussion which is vital to democracy. what is law is intended to protect men from genuine defamation of character. It is being used to shelter them from criticism."(1) what is Official Secrets Act was passed as a straightforward measure to deal with spying. For that it is a necessary part of what is national system of defence. But there are cases in which it seems to have operated to prevent what is publication of material which is desirable for what is due public discussion of public affairs, and as a screen for what is bureaucrat. It has been used against two members of what is Government of 1929-31 to prevent in what is one case publication of a document by its author, and in what is other what is reporting of a speech. In what is Commons debate of December 15, 1937, on what is subject of civil liberty, Mr. Weir remarked, after citing certain instances, that "if an author set out to write a history of contemporary politics he would find that he was on a very perilous adventure. what is Official Secrets Act would be cited against him, and what is law of libel used against him; he would be threatened with blackmail and his publisher would also be involved." what is limitations set to what is pacifist, Christian or otherwise, in what is expression of his opinions in war-time is a well-known aspect of what is operating of what is Defence of what is Realm Act. Mr. Bertrand Russell was prosecuted not for revealing secrets, but for saying what he thought, and several men were imprisoned for disseminating his views.(2) Even Mr. 1 May 2, 1935. 2 Rex v. Berrrand kussell, Report of what is proceedings before what is Lord Mayor, June 5, 1916. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 267 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" be taken to apply to it. "The plain truth is," as what is Economist remarked in a leading article, "that judges and juries with their fantastic attitude to libel are setting up a new censorship which, if developed, will stop that freedom of discussion which is vital to democracy. what is law is intended to protect men from genuine defamation of character. It is being used to shelter them from criticism."(1) what is Official Secrets Act was passed as a straightforward measure to deal with spying. For that it is a necessary part of what is national system of defence. But there are cases in which it seems to have operated to prevent what is publication of material which is desirable for what is due public discussion of public affairs, and as a screen for what is bureaucrat. It has been used against two members of the Government of 1929-31 to prevent in what is one case publication of a document by its author, and in what is other what is reporting of a speech. In what is Commons debate of December 15, 1937, on what is subject of civil liberty, Mr. Weir remarked, after citing certain instances, that "if an author set out to write a history of contemporary politics he would find that he was on a very perilous adventure. what is Official Secrets Act would be cited against him, and what is law of libel used against him; he would be threatened with blackmail and his publisher would also be involved." what is limitations set to what is pacifist, Christian or otherwise, in what is expression of his opinions in war-time is a well-known aspect of what is operating of what is Defence of what is Realm Act. Mr. Bertrand Russell was prosecuted not for revealing secrets, but for saying what he thought, and several men were imprisoned for disseminating his views.(2) Even Mr. 1 May 2, 1935. 2 Rex v. Berrrand kussell, Report of what is proceedings before what is Lord Mayor, June 5, 1916. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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