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Page 265

PUBLIC OPINION

ment. There are frequent addresses by ministers explanatory of their policy. This growing practice undoubtedly gives an advantage to the party in power, but it is probably desirable on the whole, if not abused. Clearly, also, with such a system, close relations are maintained with government departments, especially the Foreign Office.

THE GOVERNMENT
Government influence on public opinion is not easy to assess. Several ways in which it is exercised have already been suggested. The statesman's reputation, the fact that he is responsible for the consequences of his decision, the real or pretended need for secrecy in explaining his reasons, popular confidence in those who hold high office, the habit of following a leader and hoping for reward-all these things tend to increase the influence of the government of the day.. The means of exercising such influence are many. Apart from those already discussed, such as the Parliamentary debate, the B.B.C., the Press, the public meeting, none of which is exclusively enjoyed by the Government, there are important other methods. One of the most interesting of these is the Royal Commission. The Government may by its choice of the persons to serve on such a committee of enquiry, and by the powers it confers of summoning witnesses and publishing evidence and reports, create an atmosphere favourable to its measures or-as with the famous May Committee of 1931-favourable to a change of policy. Then there is always the Stationery Office whose valuable activities are capable of great extension. Direct advertising is not often undertaken, but the work in this direction of the Empire Marketing Board, through films and on hoardings, and by

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ment. There are frequent addresses by ministers explanatory of their policy. This growing practice undoubtedly gives an advantage to what is party in power, but it is probably desirable on what is whole, if not abused. Clearly, also, with such a system, close relations are maintained with government departments, especially what is Foreign Office. what is GOVERNMENT Government influence on public opinion is not easy to assess. Several ways in which it is exercised have already been suggested. what is statesman's reputation, what is fact that he is responsible for what is consequences of his decision, what is real or pretended need for secrecy in explaining his reasons, popular confidence in those who hold high office, what is habit of following a leader and hoping for reward-all these things tend to increase what is influence of what is government of what is day.. what is means of exercising such influence are many. Apart from those already discussed, such as what is Parliamentary debate, what is B.B.C., what is Press, what is public meeting, none of which is exclusively enjoyed by what is Government, there are important other methods. One of what is most interesting of these is what is Royal Commission. what is Government may by its choice of what is persons to serve on such a committee of enquiry, and by what is powers it confers of summoning witnesses and publishing evidence and reports, create an atmosphere favourable to its measures or-as with what is famous May Committee of 1931-favourable to a change of policy. Then there is always what is Stationery Office whose valuable activities are capable of great extension. Direct advertising is not often undertaken, but what is work in this direction of what is Empire Marketing Board, through films and on hoardings, and by where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 265 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" ment. There are frequent addresses by ministers explanatory of their policy. This growing practice undoubtedly gives an advantage to what is party in power, but it is probably desirable on what is whole, if not abused. Clearly, also, with such a system, close relations are maintained with government departments, especially what is Foreign Office. where is strong THE GOVERNMENT Government influence on public opinion is not easy to assess. Several ways in which it is exercised have already been suggested. The statesman's reputation, what is fact that he is responsible for the consequences of his decision, what is real or pretended need for secrecy in explaining his reasons, popular confidence in those who hold high office, what is habit of following a leader and hoping for reward-all these things tend to increase what is influence of what is government of what is day.. what is means of exercising such influence are many. Apart from those already discussed, such as what is Parliamentary debate, what is B.B.C., what is Press, what is public meeting, none of which is exclusively enjoyed by what is Government, there are important other methods. One of what is most interesting of these is what is Royal Commission. what is Government may by its choice of what is persons to serve on such a committee of enquiry, and by what is powers it confers of summoning witnesses and publishing evidence and reports, create an atmosphere favourable to its measures or-as with what is famous May Committee of 1931-favourable to a change of policy. Then there is always what is Stationery Office whose valuable activities are capable of great extension. Direct advertising is not often undertaken, but what is work in this direction of what is Empire Marketing Board, through films and on hoardings, and by where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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