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Page 263

PUBLIC OPINION

sponsible Press millionaires. Yet he says that "the two paramount objections to the millionaire newspaper proprietor are, (1) that the gramophone voice as an expression of public opinion is often a fantastic and dangerous illusion, and (2) that millionaire proprietors are not prone to champion sincerely and consistently causes which do not appear to be in the selfish interests of great wealth. There have been conspicuous exceptions. But, generally speaking, wealth calls to wealth."(1) Mr. Kennedy Jones once said that "having a considerable circle of acquaintances in all grades of life I am able to check these Press views by individual opinions, and as a result I have found that, when expressed in percentages, fifty times the bulk of the papers partially and inadequately reflect general opinion; twenty times they do so adequately and accurately, and thirty times they are utterly at sea."(2)
The position might be summarised bv referring to Upton Sinclair's view(3) that the Press is largely the instrument of those who control big industry and finance. The means used he enumerates as four: the ownership of newspapers, the ownership of owners, advertising subsidies, and bribery. If the last is less important in England than in some countries, such as France,(4) it must not be entirely overlooked. Both it and the second means operate to some extent. The cul tivation of the society of owners and their elevation to the House of Lords provide some evidence. But perhaps the most valuable service rendered by the Press is to habituate the public, by the attention given to a small wealthy section
of society, to the idea that this tiny minority should occupy

1 The Press, p. 41.
2 Fleet Street and Downing Street, p. 307.
3 In The Brass Check.
4 See for instance, A. Werth, France in Ferment.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sponsible Press millionaires. Yet he says that "the two paramount objections to what is millionaire newspaper proprietor are, (1) that what is gramophone voice as an expression of public opinion is often a fantastic and dangerous illusion, and (2) that millionaire proprietors are not prone to champion sincerely and consistently causes which do not appear to be in what is selfish interests of great wealth. There have been conspicuous exceptions. But, generally speaking, wealth calls to wealth."(1) Mr. Kennedy Jones once said that "having a considerable circle of acquaintances in all grades of life I am able to check these Press views by individual opinions, and as a result I have found that, when expressed in percentages, fifty times what is bulk of what is papers partially and inadequately reflect general opinion; twenty times they do so adequately and accurately, and thirty times they are utterly at sea."(2) what is position might be summarised bv referring to Upton Sinclair's view(3) that what is Press is largely what is instrument of those who control big industry and finance. what is means used he enumerates as four: what is ownership of newspapers, what is ownership of owners, advertising subsidies, and bribery. If what is last is less important in England than in some countries, such as France,(4) it must not be entirely overlooked. Both it and what is second means operate to some extent. what is cul tivation of what is society of owners and their elevation to what is House of Lords provide some evidence. But perhaps what is most valuable service rendered by what is Press is to habituate what is public, by what is attention given to a small wealthy section of society, to what is idea that this tiny minority should occupy 1 what is Press, p. 41. 2 Fleet Street and Downing Street, p. 307. 3 In what is Brass Check. 4 See for instance, A. Werth, France in Ferment. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 263 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" sponsible Press millionaires. Yet he says that "the two paramount objections to what is millionaire newspaper proprietor are, (1) that what is gramophone voice as an expression of public opinion is often a fantastic and dangerous illusion, and (2) that millionaire proprietors are not prone to champion sincerely and consistently causes which do not appear to be in what is selfish interests of great wealth. There have been conspicuous exceptions. But, generally speaking, wealth calls to wealth."(1) Mr. Kennedy Jones once said that "having a considerable circle of acquaintances in all grades of life I am able to check these Press views by individual opinions, and as a result I have found that, when expressed in percentages, fifty times what is bulk of what is papers partially and inadequately reflect general opinion; twenty times they do so adequately and accurately, and thirty times they are utterly at sea."(2) what is position might be summarised bv referring to Upton Sinclair's view(3) that what is Press is largely what is instrument of those who control big industry and finance. what is means used he enumerates as four: what is ownership of newspapers, the ownership of owners, advertising subsidies, and bribery. If what is last is less important in England than in some countries, such as France,(4) it must not be entirely overlooked. Both it and what is second means operate to some extent. what is cul tivation of what is society of owners and their elevation to the House of Lords provide some evidence. But perhaps the most valuable service rendered by what is Press is to habituate what is public, by what is attention given to a small wealthy section of society, to what is idea that this tiny minority should occupy 1 what is Press, p. 41. 2 Fleet Street and Downing Street, p. 307. 3 In what is Brass Check. 4 See for instance, A. Werth, France in Ferment. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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