Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 262

PUBLIC OPINION

are a perfectly familiar feature of nineteenth-century England. The influence of Delane, as editor of the Times for thirty-six years, is a well-known fact. So is the part played by the Pall Mall Ga{etre in inducing Gladstone to send Gordon to the Sudan.(1) We find Greville writing in 1855, "the Times is going into furious opposition, and Palmerston will soon find the whole Press against him except his own paper, the Morning Post and the Morning Chronicle, neither of which has any circulation or any influence in the country."(2) But the Press of this period was of small circulation. It was expensive. It was open to widespread competition. The difference between it and the Press of to-day is that it was much more a Press of opinion, in which the editor, the writer, the thinker, exercised an influence dependent upon his ability. To-day it is the owner who influences, and his power depends not on the extent of his ability but of his newspaper property. It is significant that Mr. A. J. Spender should believe that during his thirty-three years of association with journalism the power of the editor has steadily diminished and the power of the proprietor as steadily increased.(3)
But how far, it must be asked, does this Press which influences governments and opinion in addition reflect opinion? If it could be shewn that the views of proprietors coincided with those of the public or exactly reflected the variations of popular feeling, that would clearly be an argument in favour of the present organisation of the Press. But of course it cannot. Mr. A. J. Cummings, of the staff of the News-Chronicle, has no sympathy for those who, like Mr. G. D. H. Cole, wish to diminish the liberty of irre-

1 Salmon, op. cit., pp. 395 et seq.
2 Quoted ibid. from Greville, Memoirs, vol. vii, p. 242.
3 Ibid., p. 437.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE are a perfectly familiar feature of nineteenth-century England. what is influence of Delane, as editor of what is Times for thirty-six years, is a well-known fact. So is what is part played by what is Pall Mall Ga{etre in inducing Gladstone to send Gordon to what is Sudan.(1) We find Greville writing in 1855, "the Times is going into furious opposition, and Palmerston will soon find what is whole Press against him except his own paper, what is Morning Post and what is Morning Chronicle, neither of which has any circulation or any influence in what is country."(2) But what is Press of this period was of small circulation. It was expensive. It was open to widespread competition. what is difference between it and what is Press of to-day is that it was much more a Press of opinion, in which what is editor, what is writer, what is thinker, exercised an influence dependent upon his ability. To-day it is what is owner who influences, and his power depends not on what is extent of his ability but of his newspaper property. It is significant that Mr. A. J. Spender should believe that during his thirty-three years of association with journalism what is power of what is editor has steadily diminished and what is power of what is proprietor as steadily increased.(3) But how far, it must be asked, does this Press which influences governments and opinion in addition reflect opinion? If it could be shewn that what is views of proprietors coincided with those of what is public or exactly reflected what is variations of popular feeling, that would clearly be an argument in favour of what is present organisation of what is Press. But of course it cannot. Mr. A. J. Cummings, of what is staff of what is News-Chronicle, has no sympathy for those who, like Mr. G. D. H. Cole, wish to diminish what is liberty of irre- 1 Salmon, op. cit., pp. 395 et seq. 2 Quoted ibid. from Greville, Memoirs, vol. vii, p. 242. 3 Ibid., p. 437. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 262 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" are a perfectly familiar feature of nineteenth-century England. what is influence of Delane, as editor of what is Times for thirty-six years, is a well-known fact. So is what is part played by what is Pall Mall Ga{etre in inducing Gladstone to send Gordon to what is Sudan.(1) We find Greville writing in 1855, "the Times is going into furious opposition, and Palmerston will soon find what is whole Press against him except his own paper, what is Morning Post and what is Morning Chronicle, neither of which has any circulation or any influence in what is country."(2) But what is Press of this period was of small circulation. It was expensive. It was open to widespread competition. what is difference between it and what is Press of to-day is that it was much more a Press of opinion, in which what is editor, what is writer, what is thinker, exercised an influence dependent upon his ability. To-day it is what is owner who influences, and his power depends not on what is extent of his ability but of his newspaper property. It is significant that Mr. A. J. Spender should believe that during his thirty-three years of association with journalism what is power of what is editor has steadily diminished and what is power of what is proprietor as steadily increased.(3) But how far, it must be asked, does this Press which influences governments and opinion in addition reflect opinion? If it could be shewn that what is views of proprietors coincided with those of what is public or exactly reflected what is variations of popular feeling, that would clearly be an argument in favour of what is present organisation of what is Press. But of course it cannot. Mr. A. J. Cummings, of the staff of what is News-Chronicle, has no sympathy for those who, like Mr. G. D. H. Cole, wish to diminish what is liberty of irre- 1 Salmon, op. cit., pp. 395 et seq. 2 Quoted ibid. from Greville, Memoirs, vol. vii, p. 242. 3 Ibid., p. 437. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,