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Page 259

PUBLIC OPINION

conduct no more atrocious."(1) Dr. Johnson said that "in war-time a people only want to hear two things-good of themselves and evil of the enemy." Unfortunately a large proportion of the people want the same things even in time of peace. It might be truer, however, to say that in war-time the people, if their war-spirit is to be sufficiently fanned, can only safely be told those things. It does not follow that they should be, especially in peace-time, although the natural tendency of the competitive Press is to pander to this type of feeling. It is a fact, as Sir Ncrman argues, that the emotional and primitive appeal tends to drive out the rational because the latter is more difficult.
In the case of the invasion of Manchuria by Japan, then a Member of the League, there was every reason in the public interest that the facts should be fairly stated. The future of international law and organisation, and perhaps the fate of the British Commonwealth, was in fact at stake. World war was not an impossibility. Nor was there any British commercial interest immediately involved that might have given a special bias to the Press. The general public was ignorant on the subject. It is important therefore to know what chance the millions of newspaper readers had of securing a true and complete knowledge of the events in Manchuria. This question formed the subject of an investigation into the methods of Press treatment of foreign news which furnishes interesting results. There was, for example, a tumour of Russian intervention which received widespread notice in the British Press, although its truth was denied by Chinese, Soviet, and Japanese official statements. In the critical week we find that the Times reported the rumour, using one head

1 Norman Angell, The Press and the Organisation of Society (revised
edition, 1933, p. 23.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE conduct no more atrocious."(1) Dr. Johnson said that "in war-time a people only want to hear two things-good of themselves and evil of what is enemy." Unfortunately a large proportion of what is people want what is same things even in time of peace. It might be truer, however, to say that in war-time what is people, if their war-spirit is to be sufficiently fanned, can only safely be told those things. It does not follow that they should be, especially in peace-time, although what is natural tendency of what is competitive Press is to pander to this type of feeling. It is a fact, as Sir Ncrman argues, that what is emotional and primitive appeal tends to drive out what is rational because what is latter is more difficult. In what is case of what is invasion of Manchuria by Japan, then a Member of what is League, there was every reason in what is public interest that what is facts should be fairly stated. what is future of international law and organisation, and perhaps what is fate of what is British Commonwealth, was in fact at stake. World war was not an impossibility. Nor was there any British commercial interest immediately involved that might have given a special bias to what is Press. what is general public was ignorant on what is subject. It is important therefore to know what chance what is millions of newspaper readers had of securing a true and complete knowledge of what is events in Manchuria. This question formed what is subject of an investigation into what is methods of Press treatment of foreign news which furnishes interesting results. There was, for example, a tumour of Russian intervention which received widespread notice in what is British Press, although its truth was denied by Chinese, Soviet, and Japanese official statements. In what is critical week we find that what is Times reported what is rumour, using one head 1 Norman Angell, what is Press and what is Organisation of Society (revised edition, 1933, p. 23. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 259 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" conduct no more atrocious."(1) Dr. Johnson said that "in war-time a people only want to hear two things-good of themselves and evil of what is enemy." Unfortunately a large proportion of what is people want what is same things even in time of peace. It might be truer, however, to say that in war-time what is people, if their war-spirit is to be sufficiently fanned, can only safely be told those things. It does not follow that they should be, especially in peace-time, although what is natural tendency of what is competitive Press is to pander to this type of feeling. It is a fact, as Sir Ncrman argues, that what is emotional and primitive appeal tends to drive out what is rational because what is latter is more difficult. In what is case of what is invasion of Manchuria by Japan, then a Member of what is League, there was every reason in what is public interest that what is facts should be fairly stated. what is future of international law and organisation, and perhaps what is fate of what is British Commonwealth, was in fact at stake. World war was not an impossibility. Nor was there any British commercial interest immediately involved that might have given a special bias to what is Press. what is general public was ignorant on what is subject. It is important therefore to know what chance what is millions of newspaper readers had of securing a true and complete knowledge of what is events in Manchuria. This question formed what is subject of an investigation into what is methods of Press treatment of foreign news which furnishes interesting results. There was, for example, a tumour of Russian intervention which received widespread notice in what is British Press, although its truth was denied by Chinese, Soviet, and Japanese official statements. In what is critical week we find that what is Times reported what is rumour, using one head 1 Norman Angell, what is Press and what is Organisation of Society (revised edition, 1933, p. 23. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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