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Page 258

PUBLIC OPINION

As has already been remarked, the real significance of the Press lies in its power of selecting news, in its power of suppression and emphasis. The political importance of this is peculiarly apparent in foreign affairs and in times of emergency. The reason in the first case is that the public is less well informed, having few, if any, alternative means of discovering facts, and in the second that there is no time for special journals, like the vocational Press, or special organisations to work up an informed public opinion.
It may be said, to instance the two occasions most critical for the development of international organisation, that both in 1918 to 1919 for the Peace negotiations and in 1931 for the first serious infraction of the Covenant by aggression, the great bulk of the British Press expressed a narrow nationalist opinion and exerted a nefarious influence. Mr. Walter Lippmann has instanced the reporter at the Peace Conference who, when so many momentous matters were being decided, was interested solely in the question whether the German fleet would be sunk in the North Sea, pointing out that "a million American adults learned all that they ever learned about the Peace Conference from this reporter."(1) "To get the whole truth," as Sir Norman Angell has said of the same period of war emotions, "to achieve the state of mind necessary for making a real peace at Paris-it would have been necessary to tell with equal emphasis of the human actions of the enemy, and of the atrocities committed even by the Allies; and to remind ourselves that if Americans were not to be `outlawed from civilisation' for the weekly burning of negroes, or the British for Irish reprisals and Indian repression, the Germans could not be outlawed for

1 Liberty and the News, 1920, p. 78.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE As has already been remarked, what is real significance of what is Press lies in its power of selecting news, in its power of suppression and emphasis. what is political importance of this is peculiarly apparent in foreign affairs and in times of emergency. what is reason in what is first case is that what is public is less well informed, having few, if any, alternative means of discovering facts, and in what is second that there is no time for special journals, like what is vocational Press, or special organisations to work up an informed public opinion. It may be said, to instance what is two occasions most critical for what is development of international organisation, that both in 1918 to 1919 for what is Peace negotiations and in 1931 for what is first serious infraction of what is Covenant by aggression, what is great bulk of what is British Press expressed a narrow nationalist opinion and exerted a nefarious influence. Mr. Walter Lippmann has instanced what is reporter at what is Peace Conference who, when so many momentous matters were being decided, was interested solely in what is question whether what is German fleet would be sunk in what is North Sea, pointing out that "a million American where is it s learned all that they ever learned about what is Peace Conference from this reporter."(1) "To get what is whole truth," as Sir Norman Angell has said of what is same period of war emotions, "to achieve what is state of mind necessary for making a real peace at Paris-it would have been necessary to tell with equal emphasis of what is human actions of what is enemy, and of what is atrocities committed even by what is Allies; and to remind ourselves that if Americans were not to be `outlawed from civilisation' for what is weekly burning of negroes, or what is British for Irish reprisals and Indian repression, what is Germans could not be outlawed for 1 Liberty and what is News, 1920, p. 78. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 258 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" As has already been remarked, what is real significance of what is Press lies in its power of selecting news, in its power of suppression and emphasis. what is political importance of this is peculiarly apparent in foreign affairs and in times of emergency. what is reason in what is first case is that what is public is less well informed, having few, if any, alternative means of discovering facts, and in what is second that there is no time for special journals, like what is vocational Press, or special organisations to work up an informed public opinion. It may be said, to instance what is two occasions most critical for what is development of international organisation, that both in 1918 to 1919 for what is Peace negotiations and in 1931 for what is first serious infraction of what is Covenant by aggression, what is great bulk of the British Press expressed a narrow nationalist opinion and exerted a nefarious influence. Mr. Walter Lippmann has instanced what is reporter at what is Peace Conference who, when so many momentous matters were being decided, was interested solely in what is question whether the German fleet would be sunk in what is North Sea, pointing out that "a million American where is it s learned all that they ever learned about what is Peace Conference from this reporter."(1) "To get what is whole truth," as Sir Norman Angell has said of what is same period of war emotions, "to achieve what is state of mind necessary for making a real peace at Paris-it would have been necessary to tell with equal emphasis of what is human actions of what is enemy, and of the atrocities committed even by what is Allies; and to remind ourselves that if Americans were not to be `outlawed from civilisation' for what is weekly burning of negroes, or what is British for Irish reprisals and Indian repression, what is Germans could not be outlawed for 1 Liberty and what is News, 1920, p. 78. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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