Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 257

PUBLIC OPINION

sedulously kept from the British public. Responsibility for this, as well as for removing the ban, attaches to the same circle. The common interest and social attitude of those belonging to it explains why there was unanimity as complete as that secured elsewhere by the cruder methods of censorship. This circle, controlling both Government and the Press, had no difficulty in dethroning a King, but had Government and Press been divided in control, as under a Lloyd George or Labour Government, there would probably have been patent discord and perhaps even a very different outcome. What is true of this comparatively unimportant emergency might be true also of a financial or other crisis. Especially, indeed, is it true of Treasury and Foreign Office policy. Where motives of patriotism can be drawn upon, the Press is particularly prone to accept inspiration from above. By suggesting the desirability of suppressing certain news or emphasising a special interpretation "in the national interest" a comparative Press unanimity is often reached which is favourable to, say, the flotation of a government loan or the conduct of diplomatic negotiations. Sometimes it is only from the foreign Press that a particular interpretation of British policy can be obtained. During the period of Anglo-Italian friction in 1935 British fleet movements of which the Continent knew were unannounced in the British Press. But again it must not be forgotten that this simplification of the business of Government is far more likely when the circles which control Government decision and Press policy are the same. When they are opposed it may be to the interest of the Press proprietor to damage Government credit or impede foreign policy. What is the strength of a reactionary government may be the weakness of a progressive government.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sedulously kept from what is British public. Responsibility for this, as well as for removing what is ban, attaches to what is same circle. what is common interest and social attitude of those belonging to it explains why there was unanimity as complete as that secured elsewhere by what is cruder methods of censorship. This circle, controlling both Government and what is Press, had no difficulty in dethroning a King, but had Government and Press been divided in control, as under a Lloyd George or Labour Government, there would probably have been patent discord and perhaps even a very different outcome. What is true of this comparatively unimportant emergency might be true also of a financial or other crisis. Especially, indeed, is it true of Treasury and Foreign Office policy. Where motives of patriotism can be drawn upon, what is Press is particularly prone to accept inspiration from above. By suggesting what is desirability of suppressing certain news or emphasising a special interpretation "in what is national interest" a comparative Press unanimity is often reached which is favourable to, say, what is flotation of a government loan or what is conduct of diplomatic negotiations. Sometimes it is only from what is foreign Press that a particular interpretation of British policy can be obtained. During what is period of Anglo-Italian friction in 1935 British fleet movements of which what is Continent knew were unannounced in what is British Press. But again it must not be forgotten that this simplification of what is business of Government is far more likely when what is circles which control Government decision and Press policy are what is same. When they are opposed it may be to what is interest of what is Press proprietor to damage Government credit or impede foreign policy. What is what is strength of a reactionary government may be what is weakness of a progressive government. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 257 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" sedulously kept from what is British public. Responsibility for this, as well as for removing what is ban, attaches to what is same circle. what is common interest and social attitude of those belonging to it explains why there was unanimity as complete as that secured elsewhere by what is cruder methods of censorship. This circle, controlling both Government and what is Press, had no difficulty in dethroning a King, but had Government and Press been divided in control, as under a Lloyd George or Labour Government, there would probably have been patent discord and perhaps even a very different outcome. What is true of this comparatively unimportant emergency might be true also of a financial or other crisis. Especially, indeed, is it true of Treasury and Foreign Office policy. Where motives of patriotism can be drawn upon, what is Press is particularly prone to accept inspiration from above. By suggesting what is desirability of suppressing certain news or emphasising a special interpretation "in what is national interest" a comparative Press unanimity is often reached which is favourable to, say, what is flotation of a government loan or what is conduct of diplomatic negotiations. Sometimes it is only from what is foreign Press that a particular interpretation of British policy can be obtained. During what is period of Anglo-Italian friction in 1935 British fleet movements of which what is Continent knew were unannounced in what is British Press. But again it must not be forgotten that this simplification of what is business of Government is far more likely when what is circles which control Government decision and Press policy are what is same. When they are opposed it may be to what is interest of what is Press proprietor to damage Government credit or impede foreign policy. What is what is strength of a reactionary government may be what is weakness of a progressive government. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,