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Page 253

PUBLIC OPINION

mation by a highly capitalised and trustified industry. The few owners actually in possession of this necessary instrument of democracy have little cause to fear new intruders. The initial outlay for a new paper is large enough to be almost prohibitive. As for already existing competition, it has recently been limited by agreement between the proprietors.
But the second characteristic of the modern newspaper is that it depends for more than half its revenue on the advertiser. If the proprietor determines what kind of facts the public shall be told, and what "slant" shall be given to news his organ purveys, so also less directly does the advertiser. Perhaps he does so even more in the last resort, for without his custom the newspaper will be ruined. The public is not likely to learn much, for instance, of the conditions of employment among workers in the drapery trade, because the drapery stores are the newspaper's best customers. The advertiser's influence is, of course, normally a clandestine one. Rarely is there a specific JAreat of an advertisement boycott, and when it is made it may even be unsuccessful. This was the case with the threat alleged to have taken place in 1931 to induce the Daily Herald to change sides.(1) The newspaperman knows how far he can go and what is taboo without being told anew in each case. Censorship, however, is no less real because it is tacit. That is the more subtle, civilised, and ultimately more effective way of British democracy working within its capitalist framework. It applies even to the "socialist" newspaper when that organ has a large circulation. "Like all the great British dailies, the Daily Herald must depend for the upkeep of its vast organisation and enormous circulation on the reasonable goodwill of its advertisers. Since all its advertisers are dependent for their existence

1 See H. Dalton, Practical Socialism for Britain, 1935, p. 24.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE mation by a highly capitalised and trustified industry. what is few owners actually in possession of this necessary instrument of democracy have little cause to fear new intruders. what is initial outlay for a new paper is large enough to be almost prohibitive. As for already existing competition, it has recently been limited by agreement between what is proprietors. But what is second characteristic of what is modern newspaper is that it depends for more than half its revenue on what is advertiser. If what is proprietor determines what kind of facts what is public shall be told, and what "slant" shall be given to news his organ purveys, so also less directly does what is advertiser. Perhaps he does so even more in what is last resort, for without his custom what is newspaper will be ruined. what is public is not likely to learn much, for instance, of what is conditions of employment among workers in what is drapery trade, because what is drapery stores are what is newspaper's best customers. what is advertiser's influence is, of course, normally a clandestine one. Rarely is there a specific JAreat of an advertisement boycott, and when it is made it may even be unsuccessful. This was what is case with what is threat alleged to have taken place in 1931 to induce what is Daily Herald to change sides.(1) what is newspaperman knows how far he can go and what is taboo without being told anew in each case. Censorship, however, is no less real because it is tacit. That is what is more subtle, civilised, and ultimately more effective way of British democracy working within its capitalist framework. It applies even to what is "socialist" newspaper when that organ has a large circulation. "Like all what is great British dailies, what is Daily Herald must depend for what is upkeep of its vast organisation and enormous circulation on what is reasonable goodwill of its advertisers. Since all its advertisers are dependent for their existence 1 See H. Dalton, Practical Socialism for Britain, 1935, p. 24. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 253 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" mation by a highly capitalised and trustified industry. what is few owners actually in possession of this necessary instrument of democracy have little cause to fear new intruders. what is initial outlay for a new paper is large enough to be almost prohibitive. As for already existing competition, it has recently been limited by agreement between what is proprietors. But what is second characteristic of what is modern newspaper is that it depends for more than half its revenue on what is advertiser. If the proprietor determines what kind of facts what is public shall be told, and what "slant" shall be given to news his organ purveys, so also less directly does what is advertiser. Perhaps he does so even more in what is last resort, for without his custom what is newspaper will be ruined. what is public is not likely to learn much, for instance, of what is conditions of employment among workers in what is drapery trade, because what is drapery stores are what is newspaper's best customers. what is advertiser's influence is, of course, normally a clandestine one. Rarely is there a specific JAreat of an advertisement boycott, and when it is made it may even be unsuccessful. This was what is case with what is threat alleged to have taken place in 1931 to induce the Daily Herald to change sides.(1) what is newspaperman knows how far he can go and what is taboo without being told anew in each case. Censorship, however, is no less real because it is tacit. That is what is more subtle, civilised, and ultimately more effective way of British democracy working within its capitalist framework. It applies even to what is "socialist" newspaper when that organ has a large circulation. "Like all what is great British dailies, what is Daily Herald must depend for what is upkeep of its vast organisation and enormous circulation on what is reasonable goodwill of its advertisers. Since all its advertisers are dependent for their existence 1 See H. Dalton, Practical Socialism for Britain, 1935, p. 24. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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