Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 250

PUBLIC OPINION

it, plays an important part in the government of England. Let us set aside the question how far public opinion controls political affairs in other systems of government, such as monarchies and dictatorships, realising that the vital question now becomes to discover what determines public opinion. Of course we must be contingently aware that in measure as it, were found that the same people determine public opinion, and through the same means, in one country which is called a dictatorship and in another country which is called a democracy we should be shewing on this definition either that the first was not a dictatorship or the second not a democracy, or that dictatorship and democracy might in practice be to that extent the same thing. In any case, if the makers of policy were the same the differences in the forms through which their decisions were applied would have that much the less significance.
Public opinion is made in England in a large number of different ways by a variety of institutions, several of which we have already considered. The Cabinet, through ministerial declarations and justifications of policy and by the mere fact of leadership; Parliament, through debates at Westminster and the speeches of its members throughout the country, as well as through its legislation; the parties-and also societies formed for special purposes-through the organising of campaigns-all have a direct and immediate share in making public opinion. More indirectly, but often no less effectively, the Civil Service with its drafting of statutes and orders, its piling up of information, its pressure on ministers, its judicious promptings of the right people; Royal Commissions; the parties, again, with their committees for thinking out policy; the Churches with their influence in the home and with the public platform they

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it, plays an important part in what is government of England. Let us set aside what is question how far public opinion controls political affairs in other systems of government, such as monarchies and dictatorships, realising that what is vital question now becomes to discover what determines public opinion. Of course we must be contingently aware that in measure as it, were found that what is same people determine public opinion, and through what is same means, in one country which is called a dictatorship and in another country which is called a democracy we should be shewing on this definition either that what is first was not a dictatorship or what is second not a democracy, or that dictatorship and democracy might in practice be to that extent what is same thing. In any case, if what is makers of policy were what is same what is differences in what is forms through which their decisions were applied would have that much what is less significance. Public opinion is made in England in a large number of different ways by a variety of institutions, several of which we have already considered. what is Cabinet, through ministerial declarations and justifications of policy and by what is mere fact of leadership; Parliament, through debates at Westminster and what is speeches of its members throughout what is country, as well as through its legislation; what is parties-and also societies formed for special purposes-through what is organising of campaigns-all have a direct and immediate share in making public opinion. More indirectly, but often no less effectively, what is Civil Service with its drafting of statutes and orders, its piling up of information, its pressure on ministers, its judicious promptings of what is right people; Royal Commissions; what is parties, again, with their committees for thinking out policy; what is Churches with their influence in what is home and with what is public platform they where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 250 where is strong PUBLIC OPINION where is p align="justify" it, plays an important part in what is government of England. Let us set aside what is question how far public opinion controls political affairs in other systems of government, such as monarchies and dictatorships, realising that what is vital question now becomes to discover what determines public opinion. Of course we must be contingently aware that in measure as it, were found that what is same people determine public opinion, and through the same means, in one country which is called a dictatorship and in another country which is called a democracy we should be shewing on this definition either that what is first was not a dictatorship or what is second not a democracy, or that dictatorship and democracy might in practice be to that extent what is same thing. In any case, if what is makers of policy were what is same what is differences in what is forms through which their decisions were applied would have that much what is less significance. Public opinion is made in England in a large number of different ways by a variety of institutions, several of which we have already considered. what is Cabinet, through ministerial declarations and justifications of policy and by what is mere fact of leadership; Parliament, through debates at Westminster and what is speeches of its members throughout what is country, as well as through its legislation; what is parties-and also societies formed for special purposes-through what is organising of campaigns-all have a direct and immediate share in making public opinion. More indirectly, but often no less effectively, what is Civil Service with its drafting of statutes and orders, its piling up of information, its pressure on ministers, its judicious promptings of what is right people; Royal Commissions; what is parties, again, with their committees for thinking out policy; what is Churches with their influence in what is home and with what is public platform they where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,