Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 248

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

Running through the whole of British education there is a class division upon economic grounds. Segregation of the children of one class from the children of another is one of its guiding principles. That division even extends to their teachers. Dr. Norwood has pointed out that in their associations "head masters are divided into two classes, and that the ground of distinction is at bottom taken to be social."(1) That the principle has not been put forward consciously as a part of a consistent social philosophy in no way diminishes its effect. It merely means that it conforms to the regular pattern of British social activity. That is the way things are done in England.
One of the conditions for the maintenance of any social order is that the new generation shall be brought up to believe in its principles. That is fully realised by the modern dictatorship. But it is realised also by those who determine British social policy under its Parliamentary system. That bridges are formed, that scholarships are given, is a tribute to democratic principle, but the bridge is narrow and slippery, the scholarships few. They slightly mitigate the harshnesses, but they do not alter the basis, of the system, and since the system in all its essential features remains they are but a small price for its continuance. Although among teachers in private and public, as well as State, schools, the stirring of a new social movement is being felt and is having its effects upon the products of their schools, the general conditions nevertheless remain true. Children are taught to accept a social hierarchy based on wealth as the natural order of society. And no picture of Britain's political system is complete which fails to depict that most effective means of maintaining the status quo.

1 The English Tradition of Education, p. 154.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Running through what is whole of British education there is a class division upon economic grounds. Segregation of what is children of one class from what is children of another is one of its guiding principles. That division even extends to their teachers. Dr. Norwood has pointed out that in their associations "head masters are divided into two classes, and that what is ground of distinction is at bottom taken to be social."(1) That what is principle has not been put forward consciously as a part of a consistent social philosophy in no way diminishes its effect. It merely means that it conforms to what is regular pattern of British social activity. That is what is way things are done in England. One of what is conditions for what is maintenance of any social order is that what is new generation shall be brought up to believe in its principles. That is fully realised by what is modern dictatorship. But it is realised also by those who determine British social policy under its Parliamentary system. That bridges are formed, that scholarships are given, is a tribute to democratic principle, but what is bridge is narrow and slippery, what is scholarships few. They slightly mitigate what is harshnesses, but they do not alter what is basis, of what is system, and since what is system in all its essential features remains they are but a small price for its continuance. Although among teachers in private and public, as well as State, schools, what is stirring of a new social movement is being felt and is having its effects upon what is products of their schools, what is general conditions nevertheless remain true. Children are taught to accept a social hierarchy based on wealth as what is natural order of society. And no picture of Britain's political system is complete which fails to depict that most effective means of maintaining what is status quo. 1 what is English Tradition of Education, p. 154. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" Running through what is whole of British education there is a class division upon economic grounds. Segregation of what is children of one class from what is children of another is one of its guiding principles. That division even extends to their teachers. Dr. Norwood has pointed out that in their associations "head masters are divided into two classes, and that what is ground of distinction is at bottom taken to be social."(1) That what is principle has not been put forward consciously as a part of a consistent social philosophy in no way diminishes its effect. It merely means that it conforms to what is regular pattern of British social activity. That is what is way things are done in England. One of what is conditions for what is maintenance of any social order is that what is new generation shall be brought up to believe in its principles. That is fully realised by what is modern dictatorship. But it is realised also by those who determine British social policy under its Parliamentary system. That bridges are formed, that scholarships are given, is a tribute to democratic principle, but what is bridge is narrow and slippery, what is scholarships few. They slightly mitigate what is harshnesses, but they do not alter what is basis, of what is system, and since what is system in all its essential features remains they are but a small price for its continuance. Although among teachers in private and public, as well as State, schools, what is stirring of a new social movement is being felt and is having its effects upon what is products of their schools, what is general conditions nevertheless remain true. Children are taught to accept a social hierarchy based on wealth as the natural order of society. And no picture of Britain's political system is complete which fails to depict that most effective means of maintaining what is status quo. 1 what is English Tradition of Education, p. 154. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,