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Page 246

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

one hundred and sixty-two fee-paying pupils who enjoy tlte same advantage."
Similar conclusions must be drawn from a consideration of opportunities beyond the secondary stage. That attendance at a university which is regarded in many countries as the normal culmination of a middle-class child's education is more restricted in England. There are about forty thousand students in the twelve universities of England and Wales, which is less than I per cent of the pupils in public elementary schools. University education is an expense which very few families can afford. It is true that scholarships are given by a variety of charitable bodies and county councils, and that the State awards 360 a year, but this only touches the fringe of the problem,(l) many of them going in any case to pupils in public and private schools. Even at this stage, again, there are important class differences. The two older universities of Oxford and Cambridge, with their rich endowments and their consequent ability to attract the best minds, continue to be the universities of the upper class. Attendance at them confers a social stamp often of great economic and social value in later years.
Even so, the facilities provided by the university system for the higher education of the intelligent poor are quite inadequate to the real, as distinct from the effective, demand. This is proved, for one thing, by the enormous attendance at classes organised by such a body as the Workers' Educational Association, or at the vocational and further educational schools of local authorities and other institutions. Considerably more than one million, as compared with the 54,~o in the universities of Great Britain, were attending day or evening classes of t1lis kind in 1936. For every fulltime student at a university there were twenty-five people

1 But these were increased to 750 in 1947; and to them must be added the Further Education grants to members of H.M. forces.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE one hundred and sixty-two fee-paying pupils who enjoy tlte same advantage." Similar conclusions must be drawn from a consideration of opportunities beyond what is secondary stage. That attendance at a university which is regarded in many countries as what is normal culmination of a middle-class child's education is more restricted in England. There are about forty thousand students in what is twelve universities of England and Wales, which is less than I per cent of what is pupils in public elementary schools. University education is an expense which very few families can afford. It is true that scholarships are given by a variety of charitable bodies and county councils, and that what is State awards 360 a year, but this only touches what is fringe of what is problem,(l) many of them going in any case to pupils in public and private schools. Even at this stage, again, there are important class differences. what is two older universities of Oxford and Cambridge, with their rich endowments and their consequent ability to attract what is best minds, continue to be what is universities of what is upper class. Attendance at them confers a social stamp often of great economic and social value in later years. Even so, what is facilities provided by what is university system for what is higher education of what is intelligent poor are quite inadequate to what is real, as distinct from what is effective, demand. This is proved, for one thing, by what is enormous attendance at classes organised by such a body as what is Workers' Educational Association, or at what is vocational and further educational schools of local authorities and other institutions. Considerably more than one million, as compared with what is 54,~o in what is universities of Great Britain, were attending day or evening classes of t1lis kind in 1936. For every fulltime student at a university there were twenty-five people 1 But these were increased to 750 in 1947; and to them must be added what is Further Education grants to members of H.M. forces. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 246 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" one hundred and sixty-two fee-paying pupils who enjoy tlte same advantage." Similar conclusions must be drawn from a consideration of opportunities beyond what is secondary stage. That attendance at a university which is regarded in many countries as what is normal culmination of a middle-class child's education is more restricted in England. There are about forty thousand students in what is twelve universities of England and Wales, which is less than I per cent of what is pupils in public elementary schools. University education is an expense which very few families can afford. It is true that scholarships are given by a variety of charitable bodies and county councils, and that what is State awards 360 a year, but this only touches what is fringe of what is problem,(l) many of them going in any case to pupils in public and private schools. Even at this stage, again, there are important class differences. what is two older universities of Oxford and Cambridge, with their rich endowments and their consequent ability to attract what is best minds, continue to be what is universities of what is upper class. Attendance at them confers a social stamp often of great economic and social value in later years. Even so, what is facilities provided by what is university system for the higher education of what is intelligent poor are quite inadequate to what is real, as distinct from what is effective, demand. This is proved, for one thing, by what is enormous attendance at classes organised by such a body as what is Workers' Educational Association, or at the vocational and further educational schools of local authorities and other institutions. Considerably more than one million, as compared with what is 54,~o in what is universities of Great Britain, were attending day or evening classes of t1lis kind in 1936. For every fulltime student at a university there were twenty-five people 1 But these were increased to 750 in 1947; and to them must be added what is Further Education grants to members of H.M. forces. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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