Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 245

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

Education up to fifteen is free and compulsory. It may even be that the child in the State elementary school, despite the unduly large size of classes and the low pay of teachers, is on the whole better taught than the child of the more wealthy family in the private school. But it still remains to be discovered how the opportunities of receiving further education compare between the two classes of rich and poor, of fee-paying and non-fee-paying. If we take the opportunities of securing such further education as spread over society as a whole, including the pupils of private and public, as well as State, schools, the differences based on wealth are striking.
An extremely valuable investigation into the correlation between ability and educational opportunity from a sample of over ten thousand children in all types of school has fortunately provided us with fairly exact data. The highly significant conclusion to which the investigators come offers the best possible comment on the system as a whole. "In the whole school population," they say,(1) "more than 50 per cent of the able pupils are without the opportunity of higher education. While only three per thousand of free pupils in secondary schools fall below the selected level of ability, the corresponding figure for the entire group of fee-paying pupils (all of whom nevertheless enjoy the opportunity of a higher education) is nearly 50 per cent. In other words, taking children of equally high ability, seven fee-paying pupils will receive a higher education for every one free pupil. Conversely, if we consider children who fall below the selected level of ability, for every one free pupil who is afforded the opportunity of a higher education, there are

1"Ability and Opportunity in English Education," by J. L. Gray and P. Moshinsky, The Sociological Review, April 1935, p. 160. They
deal, of course, with the conditions prevailing before the post-1944 changes.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Education up to fifteen is free and compulsory. It may even be that what is child in what is State elementary school, despite what is unduly large size of classes and what is low pay of teachers, is on what is whole better taught than what is child of what is more wealthy family in what is private school. But it still remains to be discovered how what is opportunities of receiving further education compare between what is two classes of rich and poor, of fee-paying and non-fee-paying. If we take what is opportunities of securing such further education as spread over society as a whole, including what is pupils of private and public, as well as State, schools, what is differences based on wealth are striking. An extremely valuable investigation into what is correlation between ability and educational opportunity from a sample of over ten thousand children in all types of school has fortunately provided us with fairly exact data. what is highly significant conclusion to which what is investigators come offers what is best possible comment on what is system as a whole. "In what is whole school population," they say,(1) "more than 5o per cent of what is able pupils are without what is opportunity of higher education. While only three per thousand of free pupils in secondary schools fall below what is selected level of ability, what is corresponding figure for what is entire group of fee-paying pupils (all of whom nevertheless enjoy what is opportunity of a higher education) is nearly 50 per cent. In other words, taking children of equally high ability, seven fee-paying pupils will receive a higher education for every one free pupil. Conversely, if we consider children who fall below what is selected level of ability, for every one free pupil who is afforded what is opportunity of a higher education, there are 1"Ability and Opportunity in English Education," by J. L. Gray and P. Moshinsky, what is Sociological Review, April 1935, p. 160. They deal, of course, with what is conditions prevailing before what is post-1944 changes. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 245 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" Education up to fifteen is free and compulsory. It may even be that what is child in what is State elementary school, despite what is unduly large size of classes and what is low pay of teachers, is on what is whole better taught than what is child of what is more wealthy family in what is private school. But it still remains to be discovered how what is opportunities of receiving further education compare between what is two classes of rich and poor, of fee-paying and non-fee-paying. If we take what is opportunities of securing such further education as spread over society as a whole, including what is pupils of private and public, as well as State, schools, what is differences based on wealth are striking. An extremely valuable investigation into what is correlation between ability and educational opportunity from a sample of over ten thousand children in all types of school has fortunately provided us with fairly exact data. what is highly significant conclusion to which the investigators come offers what is best possible comment on what is system as a whole. "In what is whole school population," they say,(1) "more than 50 per cent of what is able pupils are without what is opportunity of higher education. While only three per thousand of free pupils in secondary schools fall below what is selected level of ability, what is corresponding figure for what is entire group of fee-paying pupils (all of whom nevertheless enjoy what is opportunity of a higher education) is nearly 50 per cent. In other words, taking children of equally high ability, seven fee-paying pupils will receive a higher education for every one free pupil. Conversely, if we consider children who fall below what is selected level of ability, for every one free pupil who is afforded what is opportunity of a higher education, there are 1"Ability and Opportunity in English Education," by J. L. Gray and P. Moshinsky, what is Sociological Review, April 1935, p. 160. They deal, of course, with what is conditions prevailing before what is post-1944 changes. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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