Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 244

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

grammar schools of earlier foundation to which grants are given by local authorities must also be taken into account for they are inspected and controlled as to fees, free places, and curriculum. Yet until 1946 within the State system itself differences were made between children whose parents could afford to pay and those who could not. There were, in fact, two ways of entry into secondary schools, one by scholarship giving a free place, the other by the ability and willingness of the parent to pay fees. While primary education has been practically free since 1891, fees being abolished entirely in 1918, secondary education was still officially regarded as the responsibility of the parent in some measure, and only for the exceptional child an obligation of the State.
The Education Act of 1944 and subsequent reforms have considerably modified these conditions-by prescribing secondary education for all children over the age of eleven, by raising the school-leaving age to fifteen (with the intention of its later becoming sixteen), and by providing for part-time training up to eighteen. They offer a welcome recognition that the responsibility of the State is not confined to securing that the child shall be taught the three Rs, but that it includes an education for life, citizenship and leisure. Practice has yet to reveal how fundamentally these reforms will affect the educational scene.

III
Such, then, are some of the features of the system of early education. How far does it afford that equality of educational opportunity up to the standard of university entrance which is one of the first prerequisites of democracy? To some extent the answer has already been suggested in general terms.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE grammar schools of earlier foundation to which grants are given by local authorities must also be taken into account for they are inspected and controlled as to fees, free places, and curriculum. Yet until I94G within what is State system itself differences were made between children whose parents could afford to pay and those who could not. There were, in fact, two ways of entry into secondary schools, one by scholarship giving a free place, what is other by what is ability and willingness of what is parent to pay fees. While primary education has been practically free since 1891, fees being abolished entirely in 1918, secondary education was still officially regarded as what is responsibility of what is parent in some measure, and only for what is exceptional child an obligation of what is State. what is Education Act of 1944 and subsequent reforms have considerably modified these conditions-by prescribing secondary education for all children over what is age of eleven, by raising what is school-leaving age to fifteen (with what is intention of its later becoming sixteen), and by providing for part-time training up to eighteen. They offer a welcome recognition that what is responsibility of what is State is not confined to securing that what is child shall be taught what is three Rs, but that it includes an education for life, citizenship and leisure. Practice has yet to reveal how fundamentally these reforms will affect what is educational scene. III Such, then, are some of what is features of what is system of early education. How far does it afford that equality of educational opportunity up to what is standard of university entrance which is one of what is first prerequisites of democracy? To some extent what is answer has already been suggested in general terms. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" grammar schools of earlier foundation to which grants are given by local authorities must also be taken into account for they are inspected and controlled as to fees, free places, and curriculum. Yet until 1946 within what is State system itself differences were made between children whose parents could afford to pay and those who could not. There were, in fact, two ways of entry into secondary schools, one by scholarship giving a free place, the other by what is ability and willingness of what is parent to pay fees. While primary education has been practically free since 1891, fees being abolished entirely in 1918, secondary education was still officially regarded as what is responsibility of what is parent in some measure, and only for what is exceptional child an obligation of the State. what is Education Act of 1944 and subsequent reforms have considerably modified these conditions-by prescribing secondary education for all children over what is age of eleven, by raising what is school-leaving age to fifteen (with what is intention of its later becoming sixteen), and by providing for part-time training up to eighteen. They offer a welcome recognition that what is responsibility of what is State is not confined to securing that what is child shall be taught what is three Rs, but that it includes an education for life, citizenship and leisure. Practice has yet to reveal how fundamentally these reforms will affect what is educational scene. where is strong III Such, then, are some of what is features of what is system of early education. How far does it afford that equality of educational opportunity up to what is standard of university entrance which is one of what is first prerequisites of democracy? To some extent what is answer has already been suggested in general terms. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,