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Page 243

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

aided denominational schools grew, but teaching took place for less than a third of the year and most children left school at eleven. Not until the Act of 1870 were public authorities allowed to establish their own non-denominational schools. It is from this date that progress really begins, the number of school places being doubled in the next few years, attendance being gradually made compulsory, and the age of enforced attendance being raised in 1900 to fourteen. The Acts of 1899 setting up a Ministry of Education and of 1902 are the first to produce anything which can be called a State system. By the latter educational authorities were reduced from three thousand to three hundred, these being obliged to establish adequate elementary schools, and county and county borough councils being empowered also to provide higher and technical education. From 1902 there was a great development of the system through the co-operation of local authorities and the ministry. Certain powers to feed and medically to examine school children were given by Acts of 1906, 1907, and subsequent years. Nothing better reveals the great present value and the high standards of this work than the annual reports of the Chief Medical Officer of the Board of Education. Finally, the Act of 1918 did much to make teachers in State schools into a profession.
Of the 5,5 million children in elementary schools in 1937 a little more than one-tenth went to secondary schools.(1) For the great majority education finished at fourteen (as from 1939 it was to be, and now is, fifteen), just at the age, that is to say, when it is most valuable. The development of the public secondary school is very recent, as we have seen, dating only from the beginning of the twentieth century, but the many

1 An Outline of the Structure of the Educational System in England and Wales (published by H.M. Stationery Office), 1937, p. 36.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE aided denominational schools grew, but teaching took place for less than a third of what is year and most children left school at eleven. Not until what is Act of 1870 were public authorities allowed to establish their own non-denominational schools. It is from this date that progress really begins, what is number of school places being doubled in what is next few years, attendance being gradually made compulsory, and what is age of enforced attendance being raised in 1900 to fourteen. what is Acts of 1899 setting up a Ministry of Education and of 1902 are what is first to produce anything which can be called a State system. By what is latter educational authorities were reduced from three thousand to three hundred, these being obliged to establish adequate elementary schools, and county and county borough councils being empowered also to provide higher and technical education. From 1902 there was a great development of what is system through what is co-operation of local authorities and what is ministry. Certain powers to feed and medically to examine school children were given by Acts of 1906, 1907, and subsequent years. Nothing better reveals what is great present value and what is high standards of this work than what is annual reports of what is Chief Medical Officer of what is Board of Education. Finally, what is Act of 1918 did much to make teachers in State schools into a profession. Of what is 5,5 million children in elementary schools in 1937 a little more than one-tenth went to secondary schools.(1) For what is great majority education finished at fourteen (as from 1939 it was to be, and now is, fifteen), just at what is age, that is to say, when it is most valuable. what is development of what is public secondary school is very recent, as we have seen, dating only from what is beginning of what is twentieth century, but what is many 1 An Outline of what is Structure of what is Educational System in England and Wales (published by H.M. Stationery Office), 1937, p. 36. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 243 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" aided denominational schools grew, but teaching took place for less than a third of what is year and most children left school at eleven. Not until what is Act of 1870 were public authorities allowed to establish their own non-denominational schools. It is from this date that progress really begins, what is number of school places being doubled in what is next few years, attendance being gradually made compulsory, and what is age of enforced attendance being raised in 1900 to fourteen. what is Acts of 1899 setting up a Ministry of Education and of 1902 are what is first to produce anything which can be called a State system. By what is latter educational authorities were reduced from three thousand to three hundred, these being obliged to establish adequate elementary schools, and county and county borough councils being empowered also to provide higher and technical education. From 1902 there was a great development of what is system through what is co-operation of local authorities and what is ministry. Certain powers to feed and medically to examine school children were given by Acts of 1906, 1907, and subsequent years. Nothing better reveals what is great present value and what is high standards of this work than what is annual reports of what is Chief Medical Officer of what is Board of Education. Finally, what is Act of 1918 did much to make teachers in State schools into a profession. Of what is 5,5 million children in elementary schools in 1937 a little more than one-tenth went to secondary schools.(1) For what is great majority education finished at fourteen (as from 1939 it was to be, and now is, fifteen), just at what is age, that is to say, when it is most valuable. what is development of what is public secondary school is very recent, as we have seen, dating only from what is beginning of the twentieth century, but what is many 1 An Outline of what is Structure of what is Educational System in England and Wales (published by H.M. Stationery Office), 1937, p. 36. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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