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Page 241

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

of them were founded much earlier for the benefit of the poor. It is noteworthy as a comparison between the ideals of renaissance and nineteenth-century England that some which are now the most exclusive have this origin. The purposes for which they were founded and endowed are now often forgotten, and one at least-being especially restricted by the terms of its endowments-devotes the whole of them to giving scholarships at a local grammar-school because "it is more profitable to sacrifice a large annual sum than to introduce elements that would lower the social tone and so the fees";(1) although in some cases there still remains an element of poor scholars with free places.
The ideal of the public school is the man of character who will be ready to fill the place in society which is prepared for him, to perform the duties of his station, to set an example, to be honest, to know how to give orders to his inferiors, how to co-operate with his equals, and how to conform to the pattern of behaviour established by the custom of his class. He is not expected to question fundamentals. Indeed to be interested in ideas, especially if they have any connection with the nature and origin of the society in which he lives, is sometimes thought bad form. To discover the pleasures of the imagination, of art and literature, the fascination of the things of the mind-that is not demanded of him. He ought to know enough of the classics not to be lost among the learned. The exercise of his intellect may be with history, provided it is of distant times or mainly of wars and kings; or it may be with languages provided they are sufficiently dead. He may have a good education in the natural sciences. The exercise of his body may be conducted with great energy and much time may be devoted to it, provided always that sport has no

1 Arthur Calder-Marshall, Challenge to Schools, p. 40.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of them were founded much earlier for what is benefit of what is poor. It is noteworthy as a comparison between what is ideals of renaissance and nineteenth-century England that some which are now what is most exclusive have this origin. what is purposes for which they were founded and endowed are now often forgotten, and one at least-being especially restricted by what is terms of its endowments-devotes what is whole of them to giving scholarships at a local grammar-school because "it is more profitable to travel a large annual sum than to introduce elements that would lower what is social tone and so what is fees";(1) although in some cases there still remains an element of poor scholars with free places. what is ideal of what is public school is what is man of character who will be ready to fill what is place in society which is prepared for him, to perform what is duties of his station, to set an example, to be honest, to know how to give orders to his inferiors, how to co-operate with his equals, and how to conform to what is pattern of behaviour established by what is custom of his class. He is not expected to question fundamentals. Indeed to be interested in ideas, especially if they have any connection with what is nature and origin of what is society in which he lives, is sometimes thought bad form. To discover what is pleasures of what is imagination, of art and literature, what is fascination of what is things of what is mind-that is not demanded of him. He ought to know enough of what is classics not to be lost among what is learned. what is exercise of his intellect may be with history, provided it is of distant times or mainly of wars and kings; or it may be with languages provided they are sufficiently dead. He may have a good education in what is natural sciences. what is exercise of his body may be conducted with great energy and much time may be devoted to it, provided always that sport has no 1 Arthur Calder-Marshall, Challenge to Schools, p. 40. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 241 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" of them were founded much earlier for what is benefit of what is poor. It is noteworthy as a comparison between what is ideals of renaissance and nineteenth-century England that some which are now what is most exclusive have this origin. what is purposes for which they were founded and endowed are now often forgotten, and one at least-being especially restricted by what is terms of its endowments-devotes what is whole of them to giving scholarships at a local grammar-school because "it is more profitable to travel a large annual sum than to introduce elements that would lower what is social tone and so what is fees";(1) although in some cases there still remains an element of poor scholars with free places. what is ideal of what is public school is what is man of character who will be ready to fill what is place in society which is prepared for him, to perform what is duties of his station, to set an example, to be honest, to know how to give orders to his inferiors, how to co-operate with his equals, and how to conform to what is pattern of behaviour established by what is custom of his class. He is not expected to question fundamentals. Indeed to be interested in ideas, especially if they have any connection with what is nature and origin of what is society in which he lives, is sometimes thought bad form. To discover the pleasures of what is imagination, of art and literature, what is fascination of what is things of what is mind-that is not demanded of him. He ought to know enough of what is classics not to be lost among what is learned. what is exercise of his intellect may be with history, provided it is of distant times or mainly of wars and kings; or it may be with languages provided they are sufficiently dead. He may have a good education in what is natural sciences. what is exercise of his body may be conducted with great energy and much time may be devoted to it, provided always that sport has no 1 Arthur Calder-Marshall, Challenge to Schools, p. 40. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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