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Page 240

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

was set up in 1930 by Sir Charles Trevelyan to enquire how far "the children attending such schools receive an adequate education under suitable conditions." It reported on this central point that its "witnesses were unanimous. They regarded the present position as seriously unsatisfactory and considered that some measure of public supervision was necessary." The defects alleged included a too wide range of ages, inadequate accommodation and sanitation, insufficient books and equipment, and above all quite improperly qualified teachers. The better private schools themselves, through their "Independent Schools Association," have asked that "some means should be devised for encouraging the efficient and eliminating the inefficient school."(1) With regard to the latter, inspectors have estimated that about 15 per cent of all private schools are a"public danger," remarking, for instance, in one case that "the whole curriculum is a blind following of a worn-out tradition," and in another: "If any sort of efficiency in such subjects as geography, history, science, physical training, art, and so on were demanded as a qualification for recognition and continued existence, a large number of the private schools I inspected ... would be closed."(2)
From the private school the next step is at the age of about fourteen to the public school. Here, in the public school, we have an institution which is symptomatic of all that is good and bad in nineteenth-century English civilisation. Developed to train the children of the upper and middle classes for the professions and the higher ranks of the army, navy, and civil service, they draw their incomes generally from the high fees which have to be paid for education in them. These schools grew up for the most part in the nineteenth century, but some

1 Report of the Departmental Committee on Private Schools, p. 30.
2 Ibid., p. 27.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was set up in 1930 by Sir Charles Trevelyan to enquire how far "the children attending such schools receive an adequate education under suitable conditions." It reported on this central point that its "witnesses were unanimous. They regarded what is present position as seriously unsatisfactory and considered that some measure of public supervision was necessary." what is defects alleged included a too wide range of ages, inadequate accommodation and sanitation, insufficient books and equipment, and above all quite improperly qualified teachers. what is better private schools themselves, through their "Independent Schools Association," have asked that "some means should be devised for encouraging what is efficient and eliminating what is inefficient school."(1) With regard to what is latter, inspectors have estimated that about 15 per cent of all private schools are a"public danger," remarking, for instance, in one case that "the whole curriculum is a blind following of a worn-out tradition," and in another: "If any sort of efficiency in such subjects as geography, history, science, physical training, art, and so on were demanded as a qualification for recognition and continued existence, a large number of what is private schools I inspected ... would be closed."(2) From what is private school what is next step is at what is age of about fourteen to what is public school. Here, in what is public school, we have an institution which is symptomatic of all that is good and bad in nineteenth-century English civilisation. Developed to train what is children of what is upper and middle classes for what is professions and what is higher ranks of what is army, navy, and civil service, they draw their incomes generally from what is high fees which have to be paid for education in them. These schools grew up for what is most part in what is nineteenth century, but some 1 Report of what is Departmental Committee on Private Schools, p. 30. 2 Ibid., p. 27. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 240 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" was set up in 1930 by Sir Charles Trevelyan to enquire how far "the children attending such schools receive an adequate education under suitable conditions." It reported on this central point that its "witnesses were unanimous. They regarded what is present position as seriously unsatisfactory and considered that some measure of public supervision was necessary." The defects alleged included a too wide range of ages, inadequate accommodation and sanitation, insufficient books and equipment, and above all quite improperly qualified teachers. what is better private schools themselves, through their "Independent Schools Association," have asked that "some means should be devised for encouraging the efficient and eliminating what is inefficient school."(1) With regard to what is latter, inspectors have estimated that about 15 per cent of all private schools are a"public danger," remarking, for instance, in one case that "the whole curriculum is a blind following of a worn-out tradition," and in another: "If any sort of efficiency in such subjects as geography, history, science, physical training, art, and so on were demanded as a qualification for recognition and continued existence, a large number of the private schools I inspected ... would be closed."(2) From what is private school what is next step is at what is age of about fourteen to what is public school. Here, in what is public school, we have an institution which is symptomatic of all that is good and bad in nineteenth-century English civilisation. Developed to train what is children of what is upper and middle classes for what is professions and what is higher ranks of what is army, navy, and civil service, they draw their incomes generally from what is high fees which have to be paid for education in them. These schools grew up for what is most part in what is nineteenth century, but some 1 Report of what is Departmental Committee on Private Schools, p. 30. 2 Ibid., p. 27. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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