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Page 239

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

education not possible for the poorer homes."(1) Yet these are the schools from which the professions, the higher ranks
of the State services, and the controllers of the nation's industries and finance are almost entirely recruited. It may be doubtful whether there is any other Western country in which the elite are separated from the common herd at so early a stage. Indeed Plato's dream of this early separation of the finer and baser metals comes nearer to practical expression in England than anywhere else. But it is not founded on any estimate of latent abilities. On the contrary, it is purely fortuitous, its only basis being difference in the wealth and social standing of the parents.
The first section of the British educational system is easy to describe. It begins with the private school, preparatory and secondary, which is run by private individuals or companies for profit. There are about ten thousand of these containing 400,000 pupils of all ages.(2) Many of them are excellent, some are scandalously bad, probably a majority suffer from serious inefficiency. They are not bound to conform to any standards other than those which impose themselves through competition.(3) They must win the confidence of parents, and to do this the proprietor must be a good salesman rather than a good teacher. It is an advantage, too, if he can shew results. A good record in the winning of scholarships or the passing of examinations is the main criterion by which the ordinary parent must judge. He does not know how far he can rely on the judgment of his children. He cannot inspect the teaching, and only six per cent of these schools are under periodical inspection by the Board of Education. A committee

1 Reported in the Times, April 1, 1935.
2 Report of the Departmental Committee on Private Schools, 1932,
p. 21.
3 Eventually to be compulsorily reaistered under the Act of 1944.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE education not possible for what is poorer homes."(1) Yet these are what is schools from which what is professions, what is higher ranks of what is State services, and what is controllers of what is nation's industries and finance are almost entirely recruited. It may be doubtful whether there is any other Western country in which what is elite are separated from what is common herd at so early a stage. Indeed Plato's dream of this early separation of what is finer and baser metals comes nearer to practical expression in England than anywhere else. But it is not founded on any estimate of latent abilities. On what is contrary, it is purely fortuitous, its only basis being difference in what is wealth and social standing of what is parents. what is first section of what is British educational system is easy to describe. It begins with what is private school, preparatory and secondary, which is run by private individuals or companies for profit. There are about ten thousand of these containing 400,000 pupils of all ages.(2) Many of them are excellent, some are scandalously bad, probably a majority suffer from serious inefficiency. They are not bound to conform to any standards other than those which impose themselves through competition.(3) They must win what is confidence of parents, and to do this what is proprietor must be a good salesman rather than a good teacher. It is an advantage, too, if he can shew results. A good record in what is winning of scholarships or what is passing of examinations is what is main criterion by which what is ordinary parent must judge. He does not know how far he can rely on what is judgment of his children. He cannot inspect what is teaching, and only six per cent of these schools are under periodical inspection by what is Board of Education. A committee 1 Reported in what is Times, April 1, 1935. 2 Report of what is Departmental Committee on Private Schools, 1932, p. 21. 3 Eventually to be compulsorily reaistered under what is Act of 1944. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 239 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" education not possible for what is poorer homes."(1) Yet these are what is schools from which what is professions, what is higher ranks of what is State services, and what is controllers of what is nation's industries and finance are almost entirely recruited. It may be doubtful whether there is any other Western country in which what is elite are separated from what is common herd at so early a stage. Indeed Plato's dream of this early separation of what is finer and baser metals comes nearer to practical expression in England than anywhere else. But it is not founded on any estimate of latent abilities. On what is contrary, it is purely fortuitous, its only basis being difference in the wealth and social standing of what is parents. what is first section of what is British educational system is easy to describe. It begins with what is private school, preparatory and secondary, which is run by private individuals or companies for profit. There are about ten thousand of these containing 400,000 pupils of all ages.(2) Many of them are excellent, some are scandalously bad, probably a majority suffer from serious inefficiency. They are not bound to conform to any standards other than those which impose themselves through competition.(3) They must win what is confidence of parents, and to do this what is proprietor must be a good salesman rather than a good teacher. It is an advantage, too, if he can shew results. A good record in what is winning of scholarships or what is passing of examinations is what is main criterion by which what is ordinary parent must judge. He does not know how far he can rely on what is judgment of his children. He cannot inspect what is teaching, and only six per cent of these schools are under periodical inspection by what is Board of Education. A committee where is p align="justify" 1 Reported in what is Times, April 1, 1935. 2 Report of what is Departmental Committee on Private Schools, 1932, p. 21. 3 Eventually to be compulsorily reaistered under what is Act of 1944. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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