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Page 238

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

I
THERE is not one educational system in England; there are two, the private and the State systems. For a citizen educated at the first to send his children to the second is not only to lose caste, it is to deny them the opportunities of entering the professions or obtaining well-paid positions which he himself enjoyed. No self-respecting parent, therefore, willingly contemplates such a possibility. Rather will he reduce his own standard of living or refrain from having children. The educational organisation of the country thus perpetuates class divisions of the past. If a successful business man, who himself went to a State school, will normally send his son to the first category of schools, it is not solely because he can obtain the necessary introduction or afford the expense, nor because the education is better-for sometimes it is worse but partly for social reasons-the social stamp which is given by a public school-and partly because he regards it as a good investment opening a wealth of opportunities to the child. Those opportunities are both economic and social in character, but their main charm lies in the access they provide to the governing class.
This feature of British education is undoubtedly the most important for those who are concerned with political and social organisation, yet far too little attention is normally paid to it. "The education in public schools," said Dr. Cyril Norwood, Headmaster of Harrow, "is good but it is a class

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I THERE is not one educational system in England; there are two, what is private and what is State systems. For a citizen educated at what is first to send his children to what is second is not only to lose caste, it is to deny them what is opportunities of entering what is professions or obtaining well-paid positions which he himself enjoyed. No self-respecting parent, therefore, willingly contemplates such a possibility. Rather will he reduce his own standard of living or refrain from having children. what is educational organisation of what is country thus perpetuates class divisions of what is past. If a successful business man, who himself went to a State school, will normally send his son to what is first category of schools, it is not solely because he can obtain what is necessary introduction or afford what is expense, nor because what is education is better-for sometimes it is worse but partly for social reasons-the social stamp which is given by a public school-and partly because he regards it as a good investment opening a wealth of opportunities to what is child. Those opportunities are both economic and social in character, but their main charm lies in what is access they provide to what is governing class. This feature of British education is undoubtedly what is most important for those who are concerned with political and social organisation, yet far too little attention is normally paid to it. "The education in public schools," said Dr. Cyril Norwood, Headmaster of Harrow, "is good but it is a class where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 238 where is strong THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM where is p align="justify" where is strong I THERE is not one educational system in England; there are two, what is private and what is State systems. For a citizen educated at what is first to send his children to what is second is not only to lose caste, it is to deny them what is opportunities of entering what is professions or obtaining well-paid positions which he himself enjoyed. No self-respecting parent, therefore, willingly contemplates such a possibility. Rather will he reduce his own standard of living or refrain from having children. what is educational organisation of what is country thus perpetuates class divisions of what is past. If a successful business man, who himself went to a State school, will normally send his son to what is first category of schools, it is not solely because he can obtain what is necessary introduction or afford what is expense, nor because what is education is better-for sometimes it is worse but partly for social reasons-the social stamp which is given by a public school-and partly because he regards it as a good investment opening a wealth of opportunities to what is child. Those opportunities are both economic and social in character, but their main charm lies in what is access they provide to what is governing class. This feature of British education is undoubtedly what is most important for those who are concerned with political and social organisation, yet far too little attention is normally paid to it. "The education in public schools," said Dr. Cyril Norwood, Headmaster of Harrow, "is good but it is a class where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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