Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 236

THE CHURCH

that "the abolition of the Test and Corporation Acts, the emancipation of Roman Catholics, the admission of Jews into Parliament, the abolition of the Corn Laws, the opening of the universities, the disestablishment of the Irish Church, were all opposed by bishops and clergy in the proportion of thirty to one."(1) Yet everyone would admit to-day that these were actions of enlightenment. The bishops voted against the Reform Bill of 1831 by 21 to 2. Mr. Millbank, M.P. for the North Riding of Yorkshire, an eminent and liberal churchman, once complained that out of 700 or 800 clergymen in his constituency only ten voted for him. It was argued by a liberal protagonist in 1875 that all over the diocese in which he lived the clergy "lend rooms to the Conservatives, they dress up their scholars in blue and orange, and they appear on all public occasions as violent partisans of the Tory Party.... All the progress of the last forty years has been effected in the teeth of the clergy of the Church of England. They have at all times gone against the wishes of the people." That statement would certainly be echoed to-day by the great majority of non-Conservative candidates.
This may seem, it is true, an exaggeration when applied to the church to-day. Times have changed. The Conservatives have absorbed the Liberals and taken over some of the theses of liberalism. The violence of clerical partisanship may in some places have diminished, especially where there has been a marked growth in the power and articulateness of the working-class, as in the towns. But if the political attitude of the clergy is more negative than it was, no one can doubt that it is on the whole exerted, consciously but perhaps more often unconsciously, in defence of the social and economic system

1 See Purchase in the Church, pp. 113 et seq., for the quotations of
this paragraph

Page 237

THE CHURCH

as it is. And this means that the wealth and organisation of the church and its emissaries, in every village in the land, is an influence and an instrument for maintaining the social order on its actual lines. It is an instrument of discipline and a bulwark of unity. If, because of the diminished membership of the church, it is not so easy now to rank pulpit with platform and Press as a governing factor in the formation of public opinion, what influence the church exerts-and that is still considerable is directed as an efficient propagandist instrument of the actual social system with its actual governing classes.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that "the abolition of what is Test and Corporation Acts, what is emancipation of Roman Catholics, what is admission of Jews into Parliament, what is abolition of what is Corn Laws, what is opening of what is universities, what is disestablishment of what is Irish Church, were all opposed by bishops and clergy in what is proportion of thirty to one."(1) Yet everyone would admit to-day that these were actions of enlightenment. what is bishops voted against what is Reform Bill of 1831 by 21 to 2. Mr. Millbank, M.P. for what is North Riding of Yorkshire, an eminent and liberal churchman, once complained that out of 700 or 800 clergymen in his constituency only ten voted for him. It was argued by a liberal protagonist in 1875 that all over what is diocese in which he lived what is clergy "lend rooms to what is Conservatives, they dress up their scholars in blue and orange, and they appear on all public occasions as bad partisans of what is Tory Party.... All what is progress of what is last forty years has been effected in what is teeth of what is clergy of what is Church of England. They have at all times gone against what is wishes of what is people." That statement would certainly be echoed to-day by what is great majority of non-Conservative candidates. This may seem, it is true, an exaggeration when applied to what is church to-day. Times have changed. what is Conservatives have absorbed what is Liberals and taken over some of what is theses of liberalism. what is sports of clerical partisanship may in some places have diminished, especially where there has been a marked growth in what is power and articulateness of what is working-class, as in what is towns. But if what is political attitude of what is clergy is more negative than it was, no one can doubt that it is on what is whole exerted, consciously but perhaps more often unconsciously, in defence of what is social and economic system 1 See Purchase in what is Church, pp. 113 et seq., for what is quotations of this paragraph where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 236 where is strong THE CHURCH where is p align="justify" that "the abolition of what is Test and Corporation Acts, what is emancipation of Roman Catholics, what is admission of Jews into Parliament, what is abolition of what is Corn Laws, what is opening of what is universities, what is disestablishment of what is Irish Church, were all opposed by bishops and clergy in what is proportion of thirty to one."(1) Yet everyone would admit to-day that these were actions of enlightenment. what is bishops voted against what is Reform Bill of 1831 by 21 to 2. Mr. Millbank, M.P. for what is North Riding of Yorkshire, an eminent and liberal churchman, once complained that out of 700 or 800 clergymen in his constituency only ten voted for him. It was argued by a liberal protagonist in 1875 that all over what is diocese in which he lived what is clergy "lend rooms to what is Conservatives, they dress up their scholars in blue and orange, and they appear on all public occasions as bad partisans of what is Tory Party.... All what is progress of what is last forty years has been effected in the teeth of what is clergy of what is Church of England. They have at all times gone against what is wishes of what is people." That statement would certainly be echoed to-day by what is great majority of non-Conservative candidates. This may seem, it is true, an exaggeration when applied to the church to-day. Times have changed. what is Conservatives have absorbed what is Liberals and taken over some of what is theses of liberalism. The sports of clerical partisanship may in some places have diminished, especially where there has been a marked growth in what is power and articulateness of what is working-class, as in what is towns. But if the political attitude of what is clergy is more negative than it was, no one can doubt that it is on what is whole exerted, consciously but perhaps more often unconsciously, in defence of what is social and economic system 1 See Purchase in what is Church, pp. 113 et seq., for what is quotations of this paragraph where is p align="left" Page 237 where is strong THE CHURCH where is p align="justify" as it is. And this means that what is wealth and organisation of what is church and its emissaries, in every village in what is land, is an influence and an instrument for maintaining what is social order on its actual lines. It is an instrument of discipline and a bulwark of unity. If, because of what is diminished membership of what is church, it is not so easy now to rank pulpit with platform and Press as a governing factor in what is formation of public opinion, what influence what is church exerts-and that is still considerable is directed as an efficient pro fun dist instrument of what is actual social system with its actual governing classes. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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