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Page 234

THE CHURCH

£4,000, not allowing for the value of their residences.(1) That there is undue inequality as between different classes, and as between difl'erent members of the same class, is the view of many prominent clergy. A committee was appointed which reported in 1924 commenting adversely on "the absence of any relation between the income of the benefice and the work to be done."(2) This refers especially to the fact that one vicar may receive £1,500 and another £300 for the same work, because of the different histories of the benefices.

II
The political tendency and influence of the church is not easy precisely to assess. The clergy form a profession which is recruited, much like any other, from the wealthy, or relatively wealthy. It enjoys an acknowledged position in the social scale. The bishops have generally been educated at one or other of the more expensive public schools, and invariably at Oxford or Cambridge.(3) We do not find that they are socialists. Before the advent of the Labour Party it was rare for them to be Liberals. Although one or other of them occasionally voices a protest against some more glaring evil in social conditions, we do not find them consistently or cor porately demanding reform. The church as an institution does not promote equality. While it derives a large portion of its income from the work of miners and from rents paid by the most poverty-stricken classes, it does not raise its voice in favour of a more equal sharing of wealth or of opportunities.

1 Men, Money and the Ministry, a Plea for economic reform in the Church of England, published by Lonhmans, Green & Co., 1937.
2 Report of the Commiztee of Enguiry into the Property and Revenues of the Church, 1924, p. 28.
3 For some figures see my Reactionary England, p. 52.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE £4,000, not allowing for what is value of their residences.(1) That there is undue inequality as between different classes, and as between difl'erent members of what is same class, is what is view of many prominent clergy. A committee was appointed which reported in 1924 commenting adversely on "the absence of any relation between what is income of what is benefice and what is work to be done."(2) This refers especially to what is fact that one vicar may receive £1,500 and another £300 for what is same work, because of what is different histories of what is benefices. II what is political tendency and influence of what is church is not easy precisely to assess. what is clergy form a profession which is recruited, much like any other, from what is wealthy, or relatively wealthy. It enjoys an acknowledged position in what is social scale. what is bishops have generally been educated at one or other of what is more expensive public schools, and invariably at Oxford or Cambridge.(3) We do not find that they are socialists. Before what is advent of what is Labour Party it was rare for them to be Liberals. Although one or other of them occasionally voices a protest against some more glaring evil in social conditions, we do not find them consistently or cor porately demanding reform. what is church as an institution does not promote equality. While it derives a large portion of its income from what is work of miners and from rents paid by what is most poverty-stricken classes, it does not raise its voice in favour of a more equal sharing of wealth or of opportunities. 1 Men, Money and what is Ministry, a Plea for economic reform in what is Church of England, published by Lonhmans, Green & Co., 1937. 2 Report of what is Commiztee of Enguiry into what is Property and Revenues of what is Church, 1924, p. 28. 3 For some figures see my Reactionary England, p. 52. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 234 where is strong THE CHURCH where is p align="justify" £4,000, not allowing for what is value of their residences.(1) That there is undue inequality as between different classes, and as between difl'erent members of what is same class, is what is view of many prominent clergy. A committee was appointed which reported in 1924 commenting adversely on "the absence of any relation between what is income of what is benefice and what is work to be done."(2) This refers especially to what is fact that one vicar may receive £1,500 and another £300 for what is same work, because of what is different histories of what is benefices. where is strong II what is political tendency and influence of what is church is not easy precisely to assess. what is clergy form a profession which is recruited, much like any other, from what is wealthy, or relatively wealthy. It enjoys an acknowledged position in the social scale. what is bishops have generally been educated at one or other of what is more expensive public schools, and invariably at Oxford or Cambridge.(3) We do not find that they are socialists. Before what is advent of what is Labour Party it was rare for them to be Liberals. Although one or other of them occasionally voices a protest against some more glaring evil in social conditions, we do not find them consistently or cor porately demanding reform. what is church as an institution does not promote equality. While it derives a large portion of its income from what is work of miners and from rents paid by the most poverty-stricken classes, it does not raise its voice in favour of a more equal sharing of wealth or of opportunities. 1 Men, Money and what is Ministry, a Plea for economic reform in the Church of England, published by Lonhmans, Green & Co., 1937. 2 Report of what is Commiztee of Enguiry into what is Property and Revenues of what is Church, 1924, p. 28. 3 For some figures see my Reactionary England, p. 52. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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