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Page 229

THE CHURCH

Although the church in England has for so long been authoritarian, making its appointments from above and avoiding the representative or elective principle, it must be remembered, nevertheless, that the dean and chapter of a cathedral still go through the form of the exercise of their medieval right of choosing their own bishop. The selection takes place on receipt of the royal conge d'elire; but only the name in the royal Letter Missive which accompanies the order for election may be chosen. "The proceedings are opened," wrote the Rev. S. Tyacke, Rector of St. Levan, Cornwall, "with prayer to Almighty God to help them to a right judgment; next comes, as a matter of course, the election of the person named in the Letter Missive; and the shameless farce is wound up with a Te Deum in the Cathedral."(1)
The manner in which the ordinary clergy are appointed is still more curious. When we find a commission in the army regarded as a piece of private property originally created by the officer who raised a regiment, and passed on by sale from one to another, we are surprised that such a system could have continued into the second half of the nineteenth century. We find the explanation of its survival in its effect, most valuable to those who wished to link the control of the army with the propertied classes, of ensuring that only those should be officers who were gentlemen of means. But when we turn to the church and discover that even in the twentieth century a cure of souls is treated in the same way as in earlier times was an army commission, is regarded as a valuable piece of property, is bought and sold, we can scarcely be less surprised; nor can we fail to seek the explanation. The parishioners, together with the other liabilities or assets of a parish,

1 The Congd d'Elire, 1867, quoted in The Case for Disestablishment, p. 82.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Although what is church in England has for so long been authoritarian, making its appointments from above and avoiding what is representative or elective principle, it must be remembered, nevertheless, that what is dean and chapter of a cathedral still go through what is form of what is exercise of their medieval right of choosing their own bishop. what is selection takes place on receipt of what is royal conge d'elire; but only what is name in what is royal Letter Missive which accompanies what is order for election may be chosen. "The proceedings are opened," wrote what is Rev. S. Tyacke, Rector of St. Levan, Cornwall, "with prayer to Almighty God to help them to a right judgment; next comes, as a matter of course, what is election of what is person named in what is Letter Missive; and what is shameless farce is wound up with a Te Deum in what is Cathedral."(1) what is manner in which what is ordinary clergy are appointed is still more curious. When we find a commission in what is army regarded as a piece of private property originally created by what is officer who raised a regiment, and passed on by sale from one to another, we are surprised that such a system could have continued into what is second half of what is nineteenth century. We find what is explanation of its survival in its effect, most valuable to those who wished to where are they now what is control of what is army with what is propertied classes, of ensuring that only those should be officers who were gentlemen of means. But when we turn to what is church and discover that even in what is twentieth century a cure of souls is treated in what is same way as in earlier times was an army commission, is regarded as a valuable piece of property, is bought and sold, we can scarcely be less surprised; nor can we fail to seek what is explanation. what is parishioners, together with what is other liabilities or assets of a parish, 1 what is Congd d'Elire, 1867, quoted in what is Case for Disestablishment, p. 82. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 229 where is strong THE CHURCH where is p align="justify" Although what is church in England has for so long been authoritarian, making its appointments from above and avoiding what is representative or elective principle, it must be remembered, nevertheless, that what is dean and chapter of a cathedral still go through what is form of what is exercise of their medieval right of choosing their own bishop. what is selection takes place on receipt of what is royal conge d'elire; but only what is name in what is royal Letter Missive which accompanies what is order for election may be chosen. "The proceedings are opened," wrote what is Rev. S. Tyacke, Rector of St. Levan, Cornwall, "with prayer to Almighty God to help them to a right judgment; next comes, as a matter of course, what is election of the person named in what is Letter Missive; and what is shameless farce is wound up with a Te Deum in what is Cathedral."(1) what is manner in which what is ordinary clergy are appointed is still more curious. When we find a commission in what is army regarded as a piece of private property originally created by what is officer who raised a regiment, and passed on by sale from one to another, we are surprised that such a system could have continued into the second half of what is nineteenth century. We find what is explanation of its survival in its effect, most valuable to those who wished to where are they now what is control of what is army with what is propertied classes, of ensuring that only those should be officers who were gentlemen of means. But when we turn to what is church and discover that even in what is twentieth century a cure of souls is treated in what is same way as in earlier times was an army commission, is regarded as a valuable piece of property, is bought and sold, we can scarcely be less surprised; nor can we fail to seek what is explanation. The parishioners, together with what is other liabilities or assets of a parish, 1 what is Congd d'Elire, 1867, quoted in what is Case for Disestablishment, p. 82. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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