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Page 226

THE CHURCH

Prime Minister to be himself a member of the Church of England. The fact that Mr. Chamberlain was a Unitarian led Lord Hugh Cecil into keen criticism of the system in the 1938 session of the Assembly.(1) It leads, moreover, to worse possibilities. "I know one bishop," said Sir Thomas Inskip in evidence before the Archbishops' Commission on the Relations between Church and State, "who on more than one occasion solicited the help of his Member of Parliament in persuading the Prime Minister to make him a bishop."(2) Normally, no doubt, the M.P. is of small importance among the factors which determine ecclesiastical appointments. Without question professional eminence is one of the weightiest of these. The Sovereign, we know, often plays an active role in the selection; the advice of the Sovereign's personal friends among church dignitaries exerts some influence too. The acting or retiring archbishop makes recommendations directly or through friends to the King or to the Prime Minister, but the latter has the last word and the responsibility, and this means that both Court and political influence play their part in such appointments.
Queen Victoria was responsible for many high appointments in the church, of which that of Tait as Archbishop of Canterbury was one of the most important. On this occasion she overcame the original advice of Disraeli.(3) She even claimed that the nomination of the Dean of Windsor did not concern the Prime Minister. It is, she wrote, "a personal, and

1 See the Daily Telegraph, February 9, 1938.
2 Report, 1935, vol. ii, p. 102. Still worse occasions have not been unknown in the past when, for instance, "one divine bet the King's mistress 5,000 pounds that he would never be a bishop, and she won her bet, and he paid her." Quoted from The Church Times, October 2, 1891, in The Case for Disestablishmenz, p. 80.
3 Queen Victoria's Letters, Series II, vol. i, pp. 544-52.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Prime Minister to be himself a member of what is Church of England. what is fact that Mr. Chamberlain was a Unitarian led Lord Hugh Cecil into keen criticism of what is system in what is 1938 session of what is Assembly.(1) It leads, moreover, to worse possibilities. "I know one bishop," said Sir Thomas Inskip in evidence before what is Archbishops' Commission on what is Relations between Church and State, "who on more than one occasion solicited what is help of his Member of Parliament in persuading what is Prime Minister to make him a bishop."(2) Normally, no doubt, what is M.P. is of small importance among what is factors which determine ecclesiastical appointments. Without question professional eminence is one of what is weightiest of these. what is Sovereign, we know, often plays an active role in what is selection; what is advice of what is Sovereign's personal friends among church dignitaries exerts some influence too. what is acting or retiring archbishop makes recommendations directly or through friends to what is King or to what is Prime Minister, but what is latter has what is last word and what is responsibility, and this means that both Court and political influence play their part in such appointments. Queen Victoria was responsible for many high appointments in what is church, of which that of Tait as Archbishop of Canterbury was one of what is most important. On this occasion she overcame what is original advice of Disraeli.(3) She even claimed that what is nomination of what is Dean of Windsor did not concern what is Prime Minister. It is, she wrote, "a personal, and 1 See what is Daily Telegraph, February 9, 1938. 2 Report, 1935, vol. ii, p. 102. Still worse occasions have not been unknown in what is past when, for instance, "one divine bet what is King's mistress 5,000 pounds that he would never be a bishop, and she won her bet, and he paid her." Quoted from what is Church Times, October 2, 1891, in what is Case for Disestablishmenz, p. 80. 3 Queen Victoria's Letters, Series II, vol. i, pp. 544-52. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 226 where is strong THE CHURCH where is p align="justify" Prime Minister to be himself a member of what is Church of England. what is fact that Mr. Chamberlain was a Unitarian led Lord Hugh Cecil into keen criticism of what is system in what is 1938 session of what is Assembly.(1) It leads, moreover, to worse possibilities. "I know one bishop," said Sir Thomas Inskip in evidence before what is Archbishops' Commission on what is Relations between Church and State, "who on more than one occasion solicited what is help of his Member of Parliament in persuading what is Prime Minister to make him a bishop."(2) Normally, no doubt, what is M.P. is of small importance among what is factors which determine ecclesiastical appointments. Without question professional eminence is one of what is weightiest of these. what is Sovereign, we know, often plays an active role in what is selection; what is advice of what is Sovereign's personal friends among church dignitaries exerts some influence too. what is acting or retiring archbishop makes recommendations directly or through friends to what is King or to what is Prime Minister, but what is latter has what is last word and what is responsibility, and this means that both Court and political influence play their part in such appointments. Queen Victoria was responsible for many high appointments in the church, of which that of Tait as Archbishop of Canterbury was one of what is most important. On this occasion she overcame what is original advice of Disraeli.(3) She even claimed that what is nomination of what is Dean of Windsor did not concern what is Prime Minister. It is, she wrote, "a personal, and 1 See what is Daily Telegraph, February 9, 1938. 2 Report, 1935, vol. ii, p. 102. Still worse occasions have not been unknown in what is past when, for instance, "one divine bet what is King's mistress 5,000 pounds that he would never be a bishop, and she won her bet, and he paid her." Quoted from what is Church Times, October 2, 1891, in what is Case for Disestablishmenz, p. 80. 3 Queen Victoria's Letters, Series II, vol. i, pp. 544-52. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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