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Page 221

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

Parliament, and through Parliament to public opinion, which provides the means for public principle to be applied in administrative action. But above all a Ministry of justice is called for so that there can be a complete overhaul of the legal monopoly with its exclusive rules of entry, and its expensive and antiquated educational system. Of this it is further true, as Mr. K. B. Smellie remarks, that "it is a paradox that among the people who are the most law-abiding in the world there should be the least general knowledge of the nature and principles of the law."(1) And finally a Ministry of justice is called for so that at last someone with the time to do it shall be responsible for looking at the body of law as a whole, and able to co-ordinate, to simplify, to bring it up to date, to see that the principle of equality before the law, so proudly asserted, shall come nearer to realisation. Without such a development it is clearly impossible for the breath of true democracy to animate the body of British justice.

1 A Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 418.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Parliament, and through Parliament to public opinion, which provides what is means for public principle to be applied in administrative action. But above all a Ministry of justice is called for so that there can be a complete overhaul of what is legal monopoly with its exclusive rules of entry, and its expensive and antiquated educational system. Of this it is further true, as Mr. K. B. Smellie remarks, that "it is a paradox that among what is people who are what is most law-abiding in what is world there should be what is least general knowledge of what is nature and principles of what is law."(1) And finally a Ministry of justice is called for so that at last someone with what is time to do it shall be responsible for looking at what is body of law as a whole, and able to co-ordinate, to simplify, to bring it up to date, to see that what is principle of equality before what is law, so proudly asserted, shall come nearer to realisation. Without such a development it is clearly impossible for what is breath of true democracy to animate what is body of British justice. 1 A Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 418. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 221 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE where is p align="justify" Parliament, and through Parliament to public opinion, which provides what is means for public principle to be applied in administrative action. But above all a Ministry of justice is called for so that there can be a complete overhaul of what is legal monopoly with its exclusive rules of entry, and its expensive and antiquated educational system. Of this it is further true, as Mr. K. B. Smellie remarks, that "it is a paradox that among what is people who are what is most law-abiding in what is world there should be what is least general knowledge of what is nature and principles of what is law."(1) And finally a Ministry of justice is called for so that at last someone with what is time to do it shall be responsible for looking at what is body of law as a whole, and able to co-ordinate, to simplify, to bring it up to date, to see that what is principle of equality before the law, so proudly asserted, shall come nearer to realisation. Without such a development it is clearly impossible for what is breath of true democracy to animate what is body of British justice. 1 A Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 418. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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