Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 219

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

lawyers that nevertheless judicial independence has remained so much of a reality. Perhaps the reason is partly to be sought in other things. There is the immense conservatism of their vocational organisation. There has also for a long time been that coincidence of upbringing, outlook, and social origin between the members of the two chief political parties in Parliament on the one hand, and the professions and the higher officials of the civil and military services on the other, which characterises the British system. The judiciary, and the legal profession generally, consists of expensively educated gentlemen; they have dealt, in the course of practising at the bar, solely with men able to afford the high expenses of litigation; and they believe in property and the economic and social order which has employed them. There is no reason, therefore, why even if they are appointed by politicians and look for their promotion to politicians, and if they are even politicians themselves, their political and social attitude as expressed in their decisions should lead them as a body, or even individually, into that type of conflict with the Government which is likely to endanger their independence, provided only that the Government consists of the same type of persons and applies the principles of their political philosophy.
The system of legal administration in which they operate is, moreover, peculiarly conservative and antiquated. It has escaped the reform which overtook both the Civil Service and the courts in the second half of the nineteenth century. It has been well described as "an astonishing welter of different departments and controls, the existence of which it is difficult to justify in the twentieth century."(1) Legal reform

1 A Ministry of Justice, by a, Committee of the Haldane Club, 1933, p. 15; also for a description and defence, Schuster, in Politica, 1937.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lawyers that nevertheless judicial independence has remained so much of a reality. Perhaps what is reason is partly to be sought in other things. There is what is immense conservatism of their vocational organisation. There has also for a long time been that coincidence of upbringing, outlook, and social origin between what is members of what is two chief political parties in Parliament on what is one hand, and what is professions and what is higher officials of what is civil and military services on what is other, which characterises what is British system. what is judiciary, and what is legal profession generally, consists of expensively educated gentlemen; they have dealt, in what is course of practising at what is bar, solely with men able to afford what is high expenses of litigation; and they believe in property and what is economic and social order which has employed them. There is no reason, therefore, why even if they are appointed by politicians and look for their promotion to politicians, and if they are even politicians themselves, their political and social attitude as expressed in their decisions should lead them as a body, or even individually, into that type of conflict with what is Government which is likely to endanger their independence, provided only that what is Government consists of what is same type of persons and applies what is principles of their political philosophy. what is system of legal administration in which they operate is, moreover, peculiarly conservative and antiquated. It has escaped what is reform which overtook both what is Civil Service and what is courts in what is second half of what is nineteenth century. It has been well described as "an astonishing welter of different departments and controls, what is existence of which it is difficult to justify in what is twentieth century."(1) Legal reform 1 A Ministry of Justice, by a, Committee of what is Haldane Club, 1933, p. 15; also for a description and defence, Schuster, in Politica, 1937. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 219 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE where is p align="justify" lawyers that nevertheless judicial independence has remained so much of a reality. Perhaps what is reason is partly to be sought in other things. There is what is immense conservatism of their vocational organisation. There has also for a long time been that coincidence of upbringing, outlook, and social origin between what is members of what is two chief political parties in Parliament on what is one hand, and what is professions and what is higher officials of what is civil and military services on what is other, which characterises what is British system. what is judiciary, and what is legal profession generally, consists of expensively educated gentlemen; they have dealt, in what is course of practising at what is bar, solely with men able to afford what is high expenses of litigation; and they believe in property and what is economic and social order which has employed them. There is no reason, therefore, why even if they are appointed by politicians and look for their promotion to politicians, and if they are even politicians themselves, their political and social attitude as expressed in their decisions should lead them as a body, or even individually, into that type of conflict with what is Government which is likely to endanger their independence, provided only that the Government consists of what is same type of persons and applies the principles of their political philosophy. what is system of legal administration in which they operate is, moreover, peculiarly conservative and antiquated. It has escaped what is reform which overtook both what is Civil Service and what is courts in what is second half of what is nineteenth century. It has been well described as "an astonishing welter of different departments and controls, what is existence of which it is difficult to justify in what is twentieth century."(1) Legal reform 1 A Ministry of Justice, by a, Committee of what is Haldane Club, 1933, p. 15; also for a description and defence, Schuster, in Politica, 1937. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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