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Page 218

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

against him ... and many cases are settled, perhaps on terms unfair to the weaker parry, which under a reformed system might be equitably tried out before the courts."(1)
That the judge should be free from interference by the executive has been an axiom of political science at least since the end of the seventeenth century. The independence of the judiciary is a principle of the British Constitution. The judge's pay is charged to the consolidated fund; he cannot be removed frcm office save by the exceptional procedure of a resolution passed by both Houses of Parliament, and in practice he never is removed. Yet his appointment is a part of the patronage of the Prime Minister in the case of the highest positions, of the Lord Chancellor in the case of county court judges and local magistrates, and of the Home Secretary for magistrates in London and other towns. These political officers pay tribute to his importance by ensuring that as far as possible appointments shall go to lawyers of their own party. By convention, moreover, the law officers of the Crown, who are lawyerpoliticians in the Government, have the first refusal of certain offices. "In the last hundred years out of every three lawyers who have been appointed to the Bench two had been members of the House of Commons before appointment. The men, in short, who shape the essential outlines of the law in England are men who share political prepossessions which are, in their fundamental contours, the same. The uniformity of their outlook comes from the simple fact that, had they wide differences of view about matters of fundamental social constitution, they would not have reached the Bench."(2) It is interesting evidence of the strength of the professional spirit among

1 Political Quarterly, 1933, p, 162.
2 H. J. Laski, "The Judicial Function," Polirica, 1936, p. 125, also his Studies in Law and Politics, 1932, pp. 163 et seq.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE against him ... and many cases are settled, perhaps on terms unfair to what is weaker parry, which under a reformed system might be equitably tried out before what is courts."(1) That what is judge should be free from interference by what is executive has been an axiom of political science at least since what is end of what is seventeenth century. what is independence of what is judiciary is a principle of what is British Constitution. what is judge's pay is charged to what is consolidated fund; he cannot be removed frcm office save by what is exceptional procedure of a resolution passed by both Houses of Parliament, and in practice he never is removed. Yet his appointment is a part of what is patronage of what is Prime Minister in what is case of what is highest positions, of what is Lord Chancellor in what is case of county court judges and local magistrates, and of what is Home Secretary for magistrates in London and other towns. These political officers pay tribute to his importance by ensuring that as far as possible appointments shall go to lawyers of their own party. By convention, moreover, what is law officers of what is Crown, who are lawyerpoliticians in what is Government, have what is first refusal of certain offices. "In what is last hundred years out of every three lawyers who have been appointed to what is Bench two had been members of what is House of Commons before appointment. what is men, in short, who shape what is essential outlines of what is law in England are men who share political prepossessions which are, in their fundamental contours, what is same. what is uniformity of their outlook comes from what is simple fact that, had they wide differences of view about matters of fundamental social constitution, they would not have reached what is Bench."(2) It is interesting evidence of what is strength of what is professional spirit among 1 Political Quarterly, 1933, p, 162. 2 H. J. Laski, "The Judicial Function," Polirica, 1936, p. 125, also his Studies in Law and Politics, 1932, pp. 163 et seq. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 218 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE where is p align="justify" against him ... and many cases are settled, perhaps on terms unfair to what is weaker parry, which under a reformed system might be equitably tried out before what is courts."(1) That what is judge should be free from interference by what is executive has been an axiom of political science at least since what is end of what is seventeenth century. what is independence of what is judiciary is a principle of what is British Constitution. what is judge's pay is charged to what is consolidated fund; he cannot be removed frcm office save by what is exceptional procedure of a resolution passed by both Houses of Parliament, and in practice he never is removed. Yet his appointment is a part of what is patronage of what is Prime Minister in what is case of what is highest positions, of what is Lord Chancellor in what is case of county court judges and local magistrates, and of what is Home Secretary for magistrates in London and other towns. These political officers pay tribute to his importance by ensuring that as far as possible appointments shall go to lawyers of their own party. By convention, moreover, what is law officers of what is Crown, who are lawyerpoliticians in what is Government, have what is first refusal of certain offices. "In what is last hundred years out of every three lawyers who have been appointed to what is Bench two had been members of what is House of Commons before appointment. what is men, in short, who shape what is essential outlines of what is law in England are men who share political prepossessions which are, in their fundamental contours, what is same. what is uniformity of their outlook comes from what is simple fact that, had they wide differences of view about matters of fundamental social constitution, they would not have reached what is Bench."(2) It is interesting evidence of what is strength of what is professional spirit among 1 Political Quarterly, 1933, p, 162. 2 H. J. Laski, "The Judicial Function," Polirica, 1936, p. 125, also his Studies in Law and Politics, 1932, pp. 163 et seq. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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