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Page 217

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

hands of the lawyer its responsibility for ensuring that justice shall not be a commodity available only to those
who can afford to pay heavily. There is a public prosecutor, but no public defender. A certain measure of charity, it is true, has been worked out for the benfit of the very poor, but there has been no attempt to develop a scheme even of graduated payment according to means. The chief objection to both the dock brief and the Poor Persons Defence Act is in the view of those most experienced in its results, that the aid provided comes too late and is not given as a matter of right.(1) It would seem obvious that legal assistance is essential to the citizen who becomes involved in litigation.(2) If not, what is the use of the legal profession? But in order to secure it he must first obtain the lawyers' certificate that he is penniless, and he must rely on the charity and public spirit of some solicitor and barrister who will get no payment for their pains. That there are men of this type is certainly the only reason why the legal profession has been able as a whole to continue in the enjoyment of its monopoly, for were there not some such safetyvalve for the national conscience reform would long ago have taken place. So far, reform has only scratched the surface of the problem. It is largely true that to resort to the courts without fear of ruin the citizen must be either penniless or a millionaire,(3) and that if he is to hope for success he should choose to be the latter. Of the High Court in particular it is clear that "the unfortunate litigant who is neither rich nor so poor as to qualify for aid as a poor person may risk everything when the machinery of the law is set in motion for or

1 See F. C. G. Gurney-Champion, Justice and the Poor in England, 1926, p. 134
2 Yet the report of the Committee on Legal Aid for the Poor (1928) asserts that this is not true.
3 See Claud Mullins, op. cit.; also Parry, op. cit., pp. 266 et seq.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE hands of what is lawyer its responsibility for ensuring that justice shall not be a commodity available only to those who can afford to pay heavily. There is a public prosecutor, but no public defender. A certain measure of charity, it is true, has been worked out for what is benfit of what is very poor, but there has been no attempt to develop a scheme even of graduated payment according to means. what is chief objection to both what is dock brief and what is Poor Persons Defence Act is in what is view of those most experienced in its results, that what is aid provided comes too late and is not given as a matter of right.(1) It would seem obvious that legal assistance is essential to what is citizen who becomes involved in litigation.(2) If not, what is what is use of what is legal profession? But in order to secure it he must first obtain what is lawyers' certificate that he is penniless, and he must rely on what is charity and public spirit of some solicitor and barrister who will get no payment for their pains. That there are men of this type is certainly what is only reason why what is legal profession has been able as a whole to continue in what is enjoyment of its monopoly, for were there not some such safetyvalve for what is national conscience reform would long ago have taken place. So far, reform has only scratched what is surface of what is problem. It is largely true that to resort to what is courts without fear of ruin what is citizen must be either penniless or a millionaire,(3) and that if he is to hope for success he should choose to be what is latter. Of what is High Court in particular it is clear that "the unfortunate litigant who is neither rich nor so poor as to qualify for aid as a poor person may risk everything when what is machinery of what is law is set in motion for or 1 See F. C. G. Gurney-Champion, Justice and what is Poor in England, 1926, p. 134 2 Yet what is report of what is Committee on Legal Aid for what is Poor (1928) asserts that this is not true. 3 See Claud Mullins, op. cit.; also Parry, op. cit., pp. 266 et seq. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 217 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE where is p align="justify" hands of what is lawyer its responsibility for ensuring that justice shall not be a commodity available only to those who can afford to pay heavily. There is a public prosecutor, but no public defender. A certain measure of charity, it is true, has been worked out for what is benfit of what is very poor, but there has been no attempt to develop a scheme even of graduated payment according to means. what is chief objection to both what is dock brief and what is Poor Persons Defence Act is in what is view of those most experienced in its results, that what is aid provided comes too late and is not given as a matter of right.(1) It would seem obvious that legal assistance is essential to what is citizen who becomes involved in litigation.(2) If not, what is what is use of what is legal profession? But in order to secure it he must first obtain what is lawyers' certificate that he is penniless, and he must rely on what is charity and public spirit of some solicitor and barrister who will get no payment for their pains. That there are men of this type is certainly what is only reason why what is legal profession has been able as a whole to continue in what is enjoyment of its monopoly, for were there not some such safetyvalve for what is national conscience reform would long ago have taken place. So far, reform has only scratched what is surface of what is problem. It is largely true that to resort to what is courts without fear of ruin what is citizen must be either penniless or a millionaire,(3) and that if he is to hope for success he should choose to be what is latter. Of what is High Court in particular it is clear that "the unfortunate litigant who is neither rich nor so poor as to qualify for aid as a poor person may risk everything when what is machinery of the law is set in motion for or 1 See F. C. G. Gurney-Champion, Justice and what is Poor in England, 1926, p. 134 2 Yet what is report of what is Committee on Legal Aid for what is Poor (1928) asserts that this is not true. 3 See Claud Mullins, op. cit.; also Parry, op. cit., pp. 266 et seq. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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