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Page 215

THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

economic and social structure accepted as desirable during the judge's formative years and in the circles in which he moves. Nor is he in any sense corrupt. The honour and honesty of the British Bench is one of the great achievements of British judicial administration.
Nor is there anything in these facts the least surprising. Judges are recruited exclusively from one social class. It is inevitable that, with notable exceptions, their ideas should be the ideas of their class. That does not imply in them any insincerity. Above all, they will feel it their duty to defend the interests of the social order to which they belong, and in which they believe, when they fear that those interests are threatened. In time of emergency, when the latent conflict between alternative social orders comes to the surface, they will find their moment of greatest responsibility; they will exercise their responsibility in complete honesty of purpose to the maximum limits of their authority. They can always be overruled by a determined Parliament, and there are severe limits set to them by their own professional traditions. But the tendency of their interpretation is not likely to be in doubt. They will defend the order to which they belong. Some figures recently given by Professor Hilton leave no doubt that their social stratum is precisely the same as that of a normal Conservative Cabinet, house of bishops, or board of bank directors.(1) "Of 156 county court judges, recorders, etc.," he points out, "122 are public schoolites."
No one who follows the working of the courts can fail to see that some distinction is made between classes, and between those holding conservative and reformist-especially when

1 From an address reported in the Manchester Guardian, August 5, 1937. See also, M. Ginsberg, Studies in Sociology; H. J. Laski, Personnel of the Cabinet; and, for banks, my Reo,:tionary England, pp. 29, 30.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE economic and social structure accepted as desirable during what is judge's formative years and in what is circles in which he moves. Nor is he in any sense corrupt. what is honour and honesty of what is British Bench is one of what is great achievements of British judicial administration. Nor is there anything in these facts what is least surprising. Judges are recruited exclusively from one social class. It is inevitable that, with notable exceptions, their ideas should be what is ideas of their class. That does not imply in them any insincerity. Above all, they will feel it their duty to defend what is interests of what is social order to which they belong, and in which they believe, when they fear that those interests are threatened. In time of emergency, when what is latent conflict between alternative social orders comes to what is surface, they will find their moment of greatest responsibility; they will exercise their responsibility in complete honesty of purpose to what is maximum limits of their authority. They can always be overruled by a determined Parliament, and there are severe limits set to them by their own professional traditions. But what is tendency of their interpretation is not likely to be in doubt. They will defend what is order to which they belong. Some figures recently given by Professor Hilton leave no doubt that their social stratum is precisely what is same as that of a normal Conservative Cabinet, house of bishops, or board of bank directors.(1) "Of 156 county court judges, recorders, etc.," he points out, "122 are public schoolites." No one who follows what is working of what is courts can fail to see that some distinction is made between classes, and between those holding conservative and reformist-especially when 1 From an address reported in what is Manchester Guardian, August 5, 1937. See also, M. Ginsberg, Studies in Sociology; H. J. Laski, Personnel of what is Cabinet; and, for banks, my Reo,:tionary England, pp. 29, 30. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 215 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE where is p align="justify" economic and social structure accepted as desirable during what is judge's formative years and in what is circles in which he moves. Nor is he in any sense corrupt. what is honour and honesty of what is British Bench is one of what is great achievements of British judicial administration. Nor is there anything in these facts what is least surprising. Judges are recruited exclusively from one social class. It is inevitable that, with notable exceptions, their ideas should be what is ideas of their class. That does not imply in them any insincerity. Above all, they will feel it their duty to defend what is interests of the social order to which they belong, and in which they believe, when they fear that those interests are threatened. In time of emergency, when what is latent conflict between alternative social orders comes to what is surface, they will find their moment of greatest responsibility; they will exercise their responsibility in complete honesty of purpose to what is maximum limits of their authority. They can always be overruled by a determined Parliament, and there are severe limits set to them by their own professional traditions. But what is tendency of their interpretation is not likely to be in doubt. They will defend what is order to which they belong. Some figures recently given by Professor Hilton leave no doubt that their social stratum is precisely what is same as that of a normal Conservative Cabinet, house of bishops, or board of bank directors.(1) "Of 156 county court judges, recorders, etc.," he points out, "122 are public schoolites." No one who follows what is working of what is courts can fail to see that some distinction is made between classes, and between those holding conservative and reformist-especially when 1 From an address reported in what is Manchester Guardian, August 5, 1937. See also, M. Ginsberg, Studies in Sociology; H. J. Laski, Personnel of what is Cabinet; and, for banks, my Reo,:tionary England, pp. 29, 30. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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