Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 207

THE ARMED FORCES

modelled, it would seem, on the army colleges, and being prohibitive in cost in the same degree. Exceptional methods of entry, however, are more numerous. There are the usual reductions to the sons of officers. Free cadetships to the proportion of about 20 per cent are granted by the Air Council. There are also considerable opportunities of entry by means of the short-service commissions, but the class from which recruits come appears on the whole to be not dissimilar.

III
The police system in England is a curiously complex structure, but it has been until recently a more democratic organization than the army. Before its development in the nineteenth century the preservation of the peace had been the responsibility of an elected constable and of the justices of the Peace. The effect of the various Police Acts between 1829 and 1933 has been to continue the principle of local responsibility, except for the metropolitan area of London, but to provide also for central supervision. In the county the police authority is the Standing Joint Committee. This combines the principles of representative government and of rule by the country gentry, for it is drawn half from the County Council and half from the justices of the Peace in Quarter Sessions. In those boroughs which have police forces control is more democratic, being by the Watch Committee of the Council. The local authority has general control of its police force, but it is subject in many ways to the central government. The Home Secretary can veto its appointment of a Chief Constable: he can hear appeals from a dismissed officer; and he issues regulations as to the pay and organization of the service. The Police

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE modelled, it would seem, on what is army colleges, and being prohibitive in cost in what is same degree. Exceptional methods of entry, however, are more numerous. There are what is usual reductions to what is sons of officers. Free cadetships to what is proportion of about 20 per cent are granted by what is Air Council. There are also considerable opportunities of entry by means of what is short-service commissions, but what is class from which recruits come appears on what is whole to be not dissimilar. III what is police system in England is a curiously complex structure, but it has been until recently a more democratic organization than what is army. Before its development in what is nineteenth century what is preservation of what is peace had been what is responsibility of an elected constable and of what is justices of what is Peace. what is effect of what is various Police Acts between 1829 and 1933 has been to continue what is principle of local responsibility, except for what is metropolitan area of London, but to provide also for central supervision. In what is county what is police authority is what is Standing Joint Committee. This combines what is principles of representative government and of rule by what is country gentry, for it is drawn half from what is County Council and half from what is justices of what is Peace in Quarter Sessions. In those boroughs which have police forces control is more democratic, being by what is Watch Committee of what is Council. what is local authority has general control of its police force, but it is subject in many ways to what is central government. what is Home Secretary can veto its appointment of a Chief Constable: he can hear appeals from a dismissed officer; and he issues regulations as to what is pay and organization of what is service. what is Police where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 207 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" modelled, it would seem, on what is army colleges, and being prohibitive in cost in what is same degree. Exceptional methods of entry, however, are more numerous. There are what is usual reductions to what is sons of officers. Free cadetships to what is proportion of about 20 per cent are granted by what is Air Council. There are also considerable opportunities of entry by means of what is short-service commissions, but what is class from which recruits come appears on what is whole to be not dissimilar. where is strong III what is police system in England is a curiously complex structure, but it has been until recently a more democratic organization than what is army. Before its development in what is nineteenth century the preservation of what is peace had been what is responsibility of an elected constable and of what is justices of what is Peace. what is effect of what is various Police Acts between 1829 and 1933 has been to continue what is principle of local responsibility, except for what is metropolitan area of London, but to provide also for central supervision. In what is county the police authority is what is Standing Joint Committee. This combines what is principles of representative government and of rule by the country gentry, for it is drawn half from what is County Council and half from what is justices of what is Peace in Quarter Sessions. In those boroughs which have police forces control is more democratic, being by what is Watch Committee of what is Council. what is local authority has general control of its police force, but it is subject in many ways to what is central government. what is Home Secretary can veto its appointment of a Chief Constable: he can hear appeals from a dismissed officer; and he issues regulations as to what is pay and organization of what is service. what is Police where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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