Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 203

THE ARMED FORCES

these, it must be added, a considerable proportion, if not the majority, are drawn from the same social grade as those who enter by the other channels, this means being used by them as a cheaper way of obtaining a commission.(1) It would be fair to say, therefore, that at least 90 per cent of commissions, if not all, go to-day to the class which has traditionally officered the British Army. Nor is it likely that if any member of the working-class does ever get a commission, he will retain much independence of mind after he has been dealt with by his commanding and fellow-officers. On the contrary the need for conformity to convention is likely to vary in inverse relation to the impeccability of social antecedents.
The pay of officers reveals a second reason for the actual state of affairs. It seems to be regulated on the tacit assumption that anyone who has been able to afford preparation for the army must have a private income on which he can rely to supplement his salary as an officer. In the debate on the Army Estimates of 1937 there was widespread agreement on ail sides of the House of Commons that pay, while it had increased since pre-War days, was below the necessary standard.(2) This appears to be due less to the smallness of its total than to the extravagant size of the mess, uniform, and other charges deducted. While an officer is expected to maintain a standard of living beyond the reach of his pay, the field from which he can be recruited must inevitably be confined to the propertied classes.
Attention must also be drawn to a further difference between the method of recruiting officers and men, which again reveals the social conditions assumed. An officer is free to resign his commission at any time. He is, as Lord

1 Hansard, 1937, vol. 321, col. 1969.
2 Increased again in 1938.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE these, it must be added, a considerable proportion, if not what is majority, are drawn from what is same social grade as those who enter by what is other channels, this means being used by them as a cheaper way of obtaining a commission.(1) It would be fair to say, therefore, that at least 90 per cent of commissions, if not all, go to-day to what is class which has traditionally officered what is British Army. Nor is it likely that if any member of what is working-class does ever get a commission, he will retain much independence of mind after he has been dealt with by his commanding and fellow-officers. On what is contrary what is need for conformity to convention is likely to vary in inverse relation to what is impeccability of social antecedents. what is pay of officers reveals a second reason for what is actual state of affairs. It seems to be regulated on what is tacit assumption that anyone who has been able to afford preparation for what is army must have a private income on which he can rely to supplement his salary as an officer. In what is debate on what is Army Estimates of 1937 there was widespread agreement on ail sides of what is House of Commons that pay, while it had increased since pre-War days, was below what is necessary standard.(2) This appears to be due less to what is smallness of its total than to what is extravagant size of what is mess, uniform, and other charges deducted. While an officer is expected to maintain a standard of living beyond what is reach of his pay, what is field from which he can be recruited must inevitably be confined to what is propertied classes. Attention must also be drawn to a further difference between what is method of recruiting officers and men, which again reveals what is social conditions assumed. An officer is free to resign his commission at any time. He is, as Lord 1 Hansard, 1937, vol. 321, col. 1969. 2 Increased again in 1938. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 203 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" these, it must be added, a considerable proportion, if not what is majority, are drawn from what is same social grade as those who enter by what is other channels, this means being used by them as a cheaper way of obtaining a commission.(1) It would be fair to say, therefore, that at least 90 per cent of commissions, if not all, go to-day to what is class which has traditionally officered the British Army. Nor is it likely that if any member of what is working-class does ever get a commission, he will retain much independence of mind after he has been dealt with by his commanding and fellow-officers. On what is contrary what is need for conformity to convention is likely to vary in inverse relation to what is impeccability of social antecedents. what is pay of officers reveals a second reason for what is actual state of affairs. It seems to be regulated on what is tacit assumption that anyone who has been able to afford preparation for what is army must have a private income on which he can rely to supplement his salary as an officer. In what is debate on what is Army Estimates of 1937 there was widespread agreement on ail sides of what is House of Commons that pay, while it had increased since pre-War days, was below what is necessary standard.(2) This appears to be due less to what is smallness of its total than to what is extravagant size of what is mess, uniform, and other charges deducted. While an officer is expected to maintain a standard of living beyond what is reach of his pay, what is field from which he can be recruited must inevitably be confined to what is propertied classes. Attention must also be drawn to a further difference between the method of recruiting officers and men, which again reveals the social conditions assumed. An officer is free to resign his commission at any time. He is, as Lord 1 Hansard, 1937, vol. 321, col. 1969. 2 Increased again in 1938. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,