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Page 201

THE ARMED FORCES

in May 1915. These were also supplied to the Times and to Mr. Lloyd George, from whose War Memoirs it would appear that they played a material part in the overthrow of the Asquith government.(1)
What exactly are the modern relations of generals with the Sovereign and the Court it is not easy as yet to say, but we have no reason to assume that they have changed. French, for instance, was a friend of Lord Esher who held him in great esteem, and who used his influence with King Edward VII and others to get French's views accepted by the Secretary of State against those of the Army Council.(2) Haig frequently saw George V,who told him on one occasion that he had his complete confidence,(3) and on another was "very outspoken in his determination to support me through thick and thin."(4)
When we consider the method of recruitment of army officers, their pay, their social conditions, the reason for their markedly conservative attitude in politics becomes immediately apparent. That tradition which makes the army, along with the church, the aristocrat's profession in every feudal or hierarchical society has also its significance in British democracy. Officers are drawn from the wealthy classes, soldiers from the poor. Lord Esher, indeed, laid down the two guiding principles of the British Army as: "1. It is officered on the voluntary system. 2. It is officered by a caste, with caste prejudices."(5) "In the past it largely depended for filling its ranks on those who were too uneducated and resourceless to find better-paid employment; and while the officers were drawn from the other social extreme it was a

1 War Memoirs, vol. i, pp. 199-205.
2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1937, citing the Life of
Lord Ypres, p. 140
3 Duff Cooper, Life of Haig, vol. ii, p. 63.
4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 73.
5 Esher, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 129.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in May 1915. These were also supplied to what is Times and to Mr. Lloyd George, from whose War Memoirs it would appear that they played a material part in what is overthrow of what is Asquith government.(1) What exactly are what is modern relations of generals with what is Sovereign and what is Court it is not easy as yet to say, but we have no reason to assume that they have changed. French, for instance, was a friend of Lord Esher who held him in great esteem, and who used his influence with King Edward VII and others to get French's views accepted by what is Secretary of State against those of what is Army Council.(2) Haig frequently saw George V,who told him on one occasion that he had his complete confidence,(3) and on another was "very outspoken in his determination to support me through thick and thin."(4) When we consider what is method of recruitment of army officers, their pay, their social conditions, what is reason for their markedly conservative attitude in politics becomes immediately apparent. That tradition which makes what is army, along with what is church, what is aristocrat's profession in every feudal or hierarchical society has also its significance in British democracy. Officers are drawn from what is wealthy classes, soldiers from what is poor. Lord Esher, indeed, laid down what is two guiding principles of what is British Army as: "1. It is officered on what is voluntary system. 2. It is officered by a caste, with caste prejudices."(5) "In what is past it largely depended for filling its ranks on those who were too uneducated and resourceless to find better-paid employment; and while what is officers were drawn from what is other social extreme it was a 1 War Memoirs, vol. i, pp. 199-205. 2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1937, citing what is Life of Lord Ypres, p. 140 3 Duff Cooper, Life of Haig, vol. ii, p. 63. 4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 73. 5 Esher, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 129. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 201 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" in May 1915. These were also supplied to what is Times and to Mr. Lloyd George, from whose War Memoirs it would appear that they played a material part in what is overthrow of what is Asquith government.(1) What exactly are what is modern relations of generals with what is Sovereign and what is Court it is not easy as yet to say, but we have no reason to assume that they have changed. French, for instance, was a friend of Lord Esher who held him in great esteem, and who used his influence with King Edward VII and others to get French's views accepted by what is Secretary of State against those of what is Army Council.(2) Haig frequently saw George V,who told him on one occasion that he had his complete confidence,(3) and on another was "very outspoken in his determination to support me through thick and thin."(4) When we consider what is method of recruitment of army officers, their pay, their social conditions, what is reason for their markedly conservative attitude in politics becomes immediately apparent. That tradition which makes what is army, along with what is church, what is aristocrat's profession in every feudal or hierarchical society has also its significance in British democracy. Officers are drawn from what is wealthy classes, soldiers from what is poor. Lord Esher, indeed, laid down what is two guiding principles of what is British Army as: "1. It is officered on what is voluntary system. 2. It is officered by a caste, with caste prejudices."(5) "In what is past it largely depended for filling its ranks on those who were too uneducated and resourceless to find better-paid employment; and while what is officers were drawn from what is other social extreme it was a 1 War Memoirs, vol. i, pp. 199-205. 2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1937, citing what is Life of Lord Ypres, p. 140 3 Duff Cooper, Life of Haig, vol. ii, p. 63. 4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 73. 5 Esher, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 129. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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