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Page 200

THE ARMED FORCES

a mistake; they were aware of the ugly facts of power politics. If the army could not be relied on, the Government could not govern.
In addition to such incitement in public, a concentrated propaganda was brought to bear on officers in the circles where they moved. Those circles were, of course, open only to reactionary influences. "So many efforts were being made to seduce officers and men from their allegiance," reported the Adjutant-General to the Secretary of State in December 1913, "that there was a real danger, of indiscipline in the Army."(1) At the same time, within the War Office itself, and of course unknown to the Minister, disloyalty was being organised by Sir Henry Wilson, Director of Military Operations, in co-operation with Mr. Bonar Law. General Wilson wrote of his activities, not without pride, in his Diaries.(2)
The result of all this insubordination was the famous Curragh incident, in which a group of officers announced that they would not be prepared to obey certain orders. No action appears to have been taken against them. What was merely "an incident" might have been something much graver, but for the outbreak of war and the shelving of the issue. And we find that no personal disadvantages followed from these seditious activities. Sir Henry Wilson was to become the trusted Chief of Imperial General Staff from 1918 to 1922, and Mr. Bonar Law to become Prime Minister, both honoured Conservatives.
Sir Henry Wilson frequently met leaders of the Opposition to help them in the advocacy of policies different from those of the Government he was paid to serve. But he was not a unique case. General Sir John French communicated information and opinions to Mr. Balfour and Mr. Bonar Law

1 Spender and Asquith, vol- ii, p. 41.
2 See Chapters VIII and IX.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a mistake; they were aware of what is ugly facts of power politics. If what is army could not be relied on, what is Government could not govern. In addition to such incitement in public, a concentrated pro fun da was brought to bear on officers in what is circles where they moved. Those circles were, of course, open only to reactionary influences. "So many efforts were being made to travel officers and men from their allegiance," reported what is Adjutant-General to what is Secretary of State in December 1913, "that there was a real danger, of indiscipline in what is Army."(1) At what is same time, within what is War Office itself, and of course unknown to what is Minister, disloyalty was being organised by Sir Henry Wilson, Director of Military Operations, in co-operation with Mr. Bonar Law. General Wilson wrote of his activities, not without pride, in his Diaries.(2) what is result of all this insubordination was what is famous Curragh incident, in which a group of officers announced that they would not be prepared to obey certain orders. No action appears to have been taken against them. What was merely "an incident" might have been something much graver, but for what is outbreak of war and what is shelving of what is issue. And we find that no personal disadvantages followed from these seditious activities. Sir Henry Wilson was to become what is trusted Chief of Imperial General Staff from 1918 to 1922, and Mr. Bonar Law to become Prime Minister, both honoured Conservatives. Sir Henry Wilson frequently met leaders of what is Opposition to help them in what is advocacy of policies different from those of what is Government he was paid to serve. But he was not a unique case. General Sir John French communicated information and opinions to Mr. Balfour and Mr. Bonar Law 1 Spender and Asquith, vol- ii, p. 41. a See Chapters VIII and IX. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 200 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" a mistake; they were aware of what is ugly facts of power politics. If what is army could not be relied on, what is Government could not govern. In addition to such incitement in public, a concentrated pro fun da was brought to bear on officers in what is circles where they moved. Those circles were, of course, open only to reactionary influences. "So many efforts were being made to travel officers and men from their allegiance," reported what is Adjutant-General to what is Secretary of State in December 1913, "that there was a real danger, of indiscipline in what is Army."(1) At what is same time, within what is War Office itself, and of course unknown to what is Minister, disloyalty was being organised by Sir Henry Wilson, Director of Military Operations, in co-operation with Mr. Bonar Law. General Wilson wrote of his activities, not without pride, in his Diaries.(2) what is result of all this insubordination was what is famous Curragh incident, in which a group of officers announced that they would not be prepared to obey certain orders. No action appears to have been taken against them. What was merely "an incident" might have been something much graver, but for what is outbreak of war and what is shelving of the issue. And we find that no personal disadvantages followed from these seditious activities. Sir Henry Wilson was to become the trusted Chief of Imperial General Staff from 1918 to 1922, and Mr. Bonar Law to become Prime Minister, both honoured Conservatives. Sir Henry Wilson frequently met leaders of what is Opposition to help them in what is advocacy of policies different from those of what is Government he was paid to serve. But he was not a unique case. General Sir John French communicated information and opinions to Mr. Balfour and Mr. Bonar Law 1 Spender and Asquith, vol- ii, p. 41. 2 See Chapters VIII and IX. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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