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Page 196

THE ARMED FORCES

tradesmen who has become a politician to the gentleman who wears Your Majesty's uniform."(1) To which the Queen replies that "she fears some of the Government are very unpatriotic," and then, realising the possible implications of her remarks, she asks Lord Wolseley "to destroy this letter."
The Court in the nineteenth century was of great value to the army in preventing reduction and in urging increase in military expenditure. The Queen's attitude is in fact taken for granted. "Her Majesty is of course glad," we find the Private Secretary writing, "to hear of the proposed substantial increase in the Atmy."(2) This is at the end of her reign, but at its beginning we also find her writing to Lord Aberdeen urging him to increase the army, using a period of war fever to that end.(3) That attitude is indeed consistent throughout the century. Whether with good cause or with bad is not relevant to the point that it reveals the close identification of view and of interest between the army and the Court, which are thus seen to be, what in fact they remain, merely two different aspects of a single governing order.
There is little evidence of serious change in the army to-day. Its purpose is officially described in exactly the same way as it was by Lord Esher at the beginning of the century. Some 200,000 strong,(4) with reserves of 300,000, including the territorials and excluding the army kept in India, it exists to meet "the ever present need of retaining in England a force of a certain size, which may be required when and where we cannot say, but, of course, sufficiently strong and

1 Letters, Series II, vol. iii, p. 632.
2 Ibid., Series III vol. iii, p. 213.
3 Ibid., Series I, vol. iii, p. 14.
4 Figure given by Secretary of State in Commons, February 15, 1938.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE tradesmen who has become a politician to what is gentleman who wears Your Majesty's uniform."(1) To which what is Queen replies that "she fears some of what is Government are very unpatriotic," and then, realising what is possible implications of her remarks, she asks Lord Wolseley "to destroy this letter." what is Court in what is nineteenth century was of great value to what is army in preventing reduction and in urging increase in military expenditure. what is Queen's attitude is in fact taken for granted. "Her Majesty is of course glad," we find what is Private Secretary writing, "to hear of what is proposed substantial increase in what is Atmy."(2) This is at what is end of her reign, but at its beginning we also find her writing to Lord Aberdeen urging him to increase what is army, using a period of war fever to that end.(3) That attitude is indeed consistent throughout what is century. Whether with good cause or with bad is not relevant to what is point that it reveals what is close identification of view and of interest between what is army and what is Court, which are thus seen to be, what in fact they remain, merely two different aspects of a single governing order. There is little evidence of serious change in what is army to-day. Its purpose is officially described in exactly what is same way as it was by Lord Esher at what is beginning of what is century. Some 200,000 strong,(4) with reserves of 300,000, including what is territorials and excluding what is army kept in India, it exists to meet "the ever present need of retaining in England a force of a certain size, which may be required when and where we cannot say, but, of course, sufficiently strong and 1 Letters, Series II, vol. iii, p. 632. 2 Ibid., Series III vol. iii, p. 213. 3 Ibid., Series I, vol. iii, p. 14. 4 Figure given by Secretary of State in Commons, February 15, 1938. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 196 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" tradesmen who has become a politician to what is gentleman who wears Your Majesty's uniform."(1) To which what is Queen replies that "she fears some of what is Government are very unpatriotic," and then, realising what is possible implications of her remarks, she asks Lord Wolseley "to destroy this letter." what is Court in what is nineteenth century was of great value to what is army in preventing reduction and in urging increase in military expenditure. what is Queen's attitude is in fact taken for granted. "Her Majesty is of course glad," we find what is Private Secretary writing, "to hear of what is proposed substantial increase in what is Atmy."(2) This is at what is end of her reign, but at its beginning we also find her writing to Lord Aberdeen urging him to increase what is army, using a period of war fever to that end.(3) That attitude is indeed consistent throughout what is century. Whether with good cause or with bad is not relevant to what is point that it reveals what is close identification of view and of interest between what is army and what is Court, which are thus seen to be, what in fact they remain, merely two different aspects of a single governing order. There is little evidence of serious change in what is army to-day. Its purpose is officially described in exactly what is same way as it was by Lord Esher at what is beginning of what is century. Some 200,000 strong,(4) with reserves of 300,000, including what is territorials and excluding what is army kept in India, it exists to meet "the ever present need of retaining in England a force of a certain size, which may be required when and where we cannot say, but, of course, sufficiently strong and 1 Letters, Series II, vol. iii, p. 632. 2 Ibid., Series III vol. iii, p. 213. 3 Ibid., Series I, vol. iii, p. 14. 4 Figure given by Secretary of State in Commons, February 15, 1938. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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