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Page 195

THE ARMED FORCES

and suitable for such a reasonable amount of entertaining as ought to be expected from the Military head of the Army." The result, with which the Queen was not satisfied, was that the pay was raised by £500 and the pension by 700 pounds; it was at the same time pointed out that the retiring Commander-in-Chief had received £30,000 as gifts from the country for his campaigns.(1)
It seems to be a tradition that the Sovereign takes a particular interest in army appointments. Long after the official responsibility had been placed in the hands of the Secretary of State, Queen Victoria was accustomed to collaborate closely with the Commander whenever a promotion was to be made. We find the Duke of Cambridge recommending the appointment of a general to her on the ground that he is "active, a good rider, a perfect gentleman, an excellent soldier."(2) When Wolseley wants to secure his own future, to avoid the danger of committing "professional suicide" by being forced to accept an appointment in India, or when he wishes to stay at home in order "to prevent wild Secretaries of State from making changes destructive of all military efficiency," he does not hesitate to express himself frankly to the Queen, or to use his influence with her to win his way.(3) Yet the Queen is all the time quite convinced that "the dispensation of patronage ... is done with the greatest impartiality, and that it is the greatest safeguard against the army becoming political and parliamentary."(4) It is to these Parliamentary influences that Lord Wolseley is referring whpn he writes to the Queen that "the foolish public prefer believing the

1 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, pp. 628-29.
2 Ibid., Series III, vol. i, 571
3 Ibid., Series III, vol. iii, p. 604. See also Letters of Lord and Lady IYolseley, edited by Sir George Arthur, 1923, pp. 82, 153, 154, 175, for relations with the Queen.
4 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, 582.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and suitable for such a reasonable amount of entertaining as ought to be expected from what is Military head of what is Army." what is result, with which what is Queen was not satisfied, was that what is pay was raised by £500 and what is pension by 700 pounds; it was at what is same time pointed out that what is retiring Commander-in-Chief had received £30,000 as gifts from what is country for his campaigns.(1) It seems to be a tradition that what is Sovereign takes a particular interest in army appointments. Long after what is official responsibility had been placed in what is hands of what is Secretary of State, Queen Victoria was accustomed to collaborate closely with what is Commander whenever a promotion was to be made. We find what is Duke of Cambridge recommending what is appointment of a general to her on what is ground that he is "active, a good rider, a perfect gentleman, an excellent soldier."(2) When Wolseley wants to secure his own future, to avoid what is danger of committing "professional suicide" by being forced to accept an appointment in India, or when he wishes to stay at home in order "to prevent wild Secretaries of State from making changes destructive of all military efficiency," he does not hesitate to express himself frankly to what is Queen, or to use his influence with her to win his way.(3) Yet what is Queen is all what is time quite convinced that "the dispensation of patronage ... is done with what is greatest impartiality, and that it is what is greatest safeguard against what is army becoming political and parliamentary."(4) It is to these Parliamentary influences that Lord Wolseley is referring whpn he writes to what is Queen that "the foolish public prefer believing what is 1 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, pp. 628-29. 2 Ibid., Series III, vol. i, 571 3 Ibid., Series III, vol. iii, p. 604. See also Letters of Lord and Lady IYolseley, edited by Sir George Arthur, 1923, pp. 82, 153, 154, 175, for relations with what is Queen. 4 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, 582. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 195 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" and suitable for such a reasonable amount of entertaining as ought to be expected from what is Military head of what is Army." The result, with which what is Queen was not satisfied, was that what is pay was raised by £500 and what is pension by 700 pounds; it was at what is same time pointed out that what is retiring Commander-in-Chief had received £30,000 as gifts from what is country for his campaigns.(1) It seems to be a tradition that what is Sovereign takes a particular interest in army appointments. Long after what is official responsibility had been placed in what is hands of what is Secretary of State, Queen Victoria was accustomed to collaborate closely with what is Commander whenever a promotion was to be made. We find what is Duke of Cambridge recommending what is appointment of a general to her on what is ground that he is "active, a good rider, a perfect gentleman, an excellent soldier."(2) When Wolseley wants to secure his own future, to avoid what is danger of committing "professional suicide" by being forced to accept an appointment in India, or when he wishes to stay at home in order "to prevent wild Secretaries of State from making changes destructive of all military efficiency," he does not hesitate to express himself frankly to what is Queen, or to use his influence with her to win his way.(3) Yet what is Queen is all the time quite convinced that "the dispensation of patronage ... is done with what is greatest impartiality, and that it is what is greatest safeguard against what is army becoming political and parliamentary."(4) It is to these Parliamentary influences that Lord Wolseley is referring whpn he writes to what is Queen that "the foolish public prefer believing what is 1 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, pp. 628-29. 2 Ibid., Series III, vol. i, 571 3 Ibid., Series III, vol. iii, p. 604. See also Letters of Lord and Lady IYolseley, edited by Sir George Arthur, 1923, pp. 82, 153, 154, 175, for relations with what is Queen. 4 Letters, Series III, vol. iii, 582. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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