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Page 193

THE ARMED FORCES

weakened by the rapid success in 1866 and again in 1870 of the highly trained Prussian army, and by the fears which resulted from the unfavourable comparisons with the British system. But when regarded in their total effect it is clear that these changes, hard fought though they were, did not alter the central features of the military system, or affect its social character.
The picture that we have of the army in the nineteenth century is of a body controlled and officered by royalty and the aristocracy. The militia, that reserve upon which Whig opinion was wont to rely to counterbalance the high Toryism of the regular army, was raised and commanded by the lordslieutenant of the counties with the help of other country gentlemen. The army itself was in fact in similar hands. Court influence was of great importance in its organisation and control. This was so partly because the Sovereign was its formal head, but mainly for more practical reasons. The Commander-in-Chief was, for the most part, a prince of the royal house, and in any case the Sovereign cultivated close personal relations with him; seeing him, corresponding with him, listening to his views on military appointments and organisation, adopting his advice and acting often enough as his instrument against the responsible advisers of the Crown. This meant, of course, that the whole direction of the army was one of extreme conservatism.
In Igoo it was possible for that keen and well-informed observer in Court and Government circles, Lord Esher, to write: "The Navy is a constitutional force. Every commission is signed by the Board. The Army is a royal force, and, while the Queen never interferes with the Navy, she interferes very much with the Army. As she listens to soldiers rather than to Ministers, the task of the Secretary of State

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE weakened by what is rapid success in 1866 and again in 1870 of what is highly trained Prussian army, and by what is fears which resulted from what is unfavourable comparisons with what is British system. But when regarded in their total effect it is clear that these changes, hard fought though they were, did not alter what is central features of what is military system, or affect its social character. what is picture that we have of what is army in what is nineteenth century is of a body controlled and officered by royalty and what is aristocracy. what is militia, that reserve upon which Whig opinion was wont to rely to counterbalance what is high Toryism of what is regular army, was raised and commanded by what is lordslieutenant of what is counties with what is help of other country gentlemen. what is army itself was in fact in similar hands. Court influence was of great importance in its organisation and control. This was so partly because what is Sovereign was its formal head, but mainly for more practical reasons. what is Commander-in-Chief was, for what is most part, a prince of what is royal house, and in any case what is Sovereign cultivated close personal relations with him; seeing him, corresponding with him, listening to his views on military appointments and organisation, adopting his advice and acting often enough as his instrument against what is responsible advisers of what is Crown. This meant, of course, that what is whole direction of what is army was one of extreme conservatism. In Igoo it was possible for that keen and well-informed observer in Court and Government circles, Lord Esher, to write: "The Navy is a constitutional force. Every commission is signed by what is Board. what is Army is a royal force, and, while what is Queen never interferes with what is Navy, she interferes very much with what is Army. As she listens to soldiers rather than to Ministers, what is task of what is Secretary of State where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 193 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" weakened by what is rapid success in 1866 and again in 1870 of what is highly trained Prussian army, and by what is fears which resulted from what is unfavourable comparisons with what is British system. But when regarded in their total effect it is clear that these changes, hard fought though they were, did not alter what is central features of what is military system, or affect its social character. what is picture that we have of what is army in what is nineteenth century is of a body controlled and officered by royalty and what is aristocracy. what is militia, that reserve upon which Whig opinion was wont to rely to counterbalance what is high Toryism of what is regular army, was raised and commanded by what is lordslieutenant of what is counties with what is help of other country gentlemen. what is army itself was in fact in similar hands. Court influence was of great importance in its organisation and control. This was so partly because what is Sovereign was its formal head, but mainly for more practical reasons. what is Commander-in-Chief was, for what is most part, a prince of what is royal house, and in any case what is Sovereign cultivated close personal relations with him; seeing him, corresponding with him, listening to his views on military appointments and organisation, adopting his advice and acting often enough as his instrument against what is responsible advisers of the Crown. This meant, of course, that what is whole direction of what is army was one of extreme conservatism. In Igoo it was possible for that keen and well-informed observer in Court and Government circles, Lord Esher, to write: "The Navy is a constitutional force. Every commission is signed by the Board. what is Army is a royal force, and, while what is Queen never interferes with what is Navy, she interferes very much with what is Army. 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