Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 190

THE ARMED FORCES

sibility developed in military matters, it was not until the second half of Victoria's reign that this responsibility became more than a financial one.
It is true that there was a certain lapse of the royal prerogative in the eighteenth century, but with the appointment of his son, the Duke of York, as Commander-in-Chief in 1795, the King's personal control of the army was revived. The close association of the royal family with the army, if increasingly formal, has continued ever since. But from 1795 onwards the principle was accepted that the Commanderin-Chief was responsible to no one save the Sovereign in matters of appointment, promotion, and discipline. He was a power side by side with the Cabinet, and not dependent upon it except for money. Wellington regarded the Secretaryat-War as a financial clerk. The Commander was an executive and not a ministerial official, whom it was important to keep independent of the Government, and who had direct access to the Sovereign. Dundas and Hardinge, predecessor and successor of Wellington as Commander-in-Chief, thought that the Secretary was subordinate to the Commander; it was only in matters of finance that the Commander must refer to him. The Prince Consort wrote in 1852: "The Secretary-at-War has no authority whatever except over money."(1)
The rivalry between the civil and military heads of the army reached its climax in the years after 1854. The Crimean War had revealed a condition of almost unbelievable inefficiency and unpreparedness. It was clearly imperative that something should be done to co-ordinate and reorganise the competing offices. But the movement for reform came from Parliament and from public opinion. Wellington had ex

1 Letters of Queen Victoria, Series I, vol, ii, p. 476.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sibility developed in military matters, it was not until what is second half of Victoria's reign that this responsibility became more than a financial one. It is true that there was a certain lapse of what is royal prerogative in what is eighteenth century, but with what is appointment of his son, what is Duke of York, as Commander-in-Chief in 1795, what is King's personal control of what is army was revived. what is close association of what is royal family with what is army, if increasingly formal, has continued ever since. But from 1795 onwards what is principle was accepted that what is Commanderin-Chief was responsible to no one save what is Sovereign in matters of appointment, promotion, and discipline. He was a power side by side with what is Cabinet, and not dependent upon it except for money. Wellington regarded what is Secretaryat-War as a financial clerk. what is Commander was an executive and not a ministerial official, whom it was important to keep independent of what is Government, and who had direct access to what is Sovereign. Dundas and Hardinge, predecessor and successor of Wellington as Commander-in-Chief, thought that what is Secretary was subordinate to what is Commander; it was only in matters of finance that what is Commander must refer to him. what is Prince Consort wrote in 1852: "The Secretary-at-War has no authority whatever except over money."(1) what is rivalry between what is civil and military heads of what is army reached its climax in what is years after 1854. what is Crimean War had revealed a condition of almost unbelievable inefficiency and unpreparedness. It was clearly imperative that something should be done to co-ordinate and reorganise what is competing offices. But what is movement for reform came from Parliament and from public opinion. Wellington had ex 1 Letters of Queen Victoria, Series I, vol, ii, p. 476. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 190 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" sibility developed in military matters, it was not until what is second half of Victoria's reign that this responsibility became more than a financial one. It is true that there was a certain lapse of what is royal prerogative in what is eighteenth century, but with what is appointment of his son, what is Duke of York, as Commander-in-Chief in 1795, what is King's personal control of what is army was revived. what is close association of what is royal family with what is army, if increasingly formal, has continued ever since. But from 1795 onwards what is principle was accepted that the Commanderin-Chief was responsible to no one save what is Sovereign in matters of appointment, promotion, and discipline. He was a power side by side with what is Cabinet, and not dependent upon it except for money. Wellington regarded what is Secretaryat-War as a financial clerk. what is Commander was an executive and not a ministerial official, whom it was important to keep independent of what is Government, and who had direct access to what is Sovereign. Dundas and Hardinge, predecessor and successor of Wellington as Commander-in-Chief, thought that what is Secretary was subordinate to what is Commander; it was only in matters of finance that what is Commander must refer to him. what is Prince Consort wrote in 1852: "The Secretary-at-War has no authority whatever except over money."(1) what is rivalry between what is civil and military heads of what is army reached its climax in what is years after 1854. what is Crimean War had revealed a condition of almost unbelievable inefficiency and unpreparedness. It was clearly imperative that something should be done to co-ordinate and reorganise what is competing offices. But what is movement for reform came from Parliament and from public opinion. Wellington had ex 1 Letters of Queen Victoria, Series I, vol, ii, p. 476. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,