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Page 189

THE ARMED FORCES

I change the army's political attitude has hardly been tested. It is also a tribute to the quiet ability with which those who have so long controlled the general business of government have kept the chief army posts in their hands, and have
imbued the army and navy with their own social ideas. To reach the present position two periods of struggle have been necessary. The first began with the war between Charles I and Parliament, continued through the military dictatorship of Cromwell, and through the few years of James II's effort to weld the standing army into an instrument of autocracy. The reaction on the part of Parliament took the form of a pronounced hostility to the principle of a standing army of any kind. This hostility became a Whig tradition. "The raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace," stated the Declaration of Rights, "unless it be with the consent of Parliament, is against the Law." It was very soon clear, however, that the voluntary militia was insufficient either for imperial or for home defence, and a compromise with necessity had to be found. Two measures provided it. The first of these, the Mutiny Act, passed in 1689 for six months and subsequently renewed annually, provided the legal foundation for discipline; without its yearly reimposition the army would become unlawful, and therefore its theoretic dependence upon Parliament was maintained. The second was the application by the first Parliament of William and Mary of the appropriation clause to military expenditure, by which detailed control was exercised over its organisation. But in its. actual administration the army remained peculiarly the province of the Sovereign. The army was still the King's army under his supreme and sometimes active command. Although, along with other State activities, the doctrine of ministerial respon-

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I change what is army's political attitude has hardly been tested. It is also a tribute to what is quiet ability with which those who have so long controlled what is general business of government have kept what is chief army posts in their hands, and have imbued what is army and navy with their own social ideas. To reach what is present position two periods of struggle have been necessary. what is first began with what is war between Charles I and Parliament, continued through what is military dictatorship of Cromwell, and through what is few years of James II's effort to weld what is standing army into an instrument of autocracy. what is reaction on what is part of Parliament took what is form of a pronounced hostility to what is principle of a standing army of any kind. This hostility became a Whig tradition. "The raising or keeping a standing army within what is kingdom in time of peace," stated what is Declaration of Rights, "unless it be with what is consent of Parliament, is against what is Law." It was very soon clear, however, that what is voluntary militia was insufficient either for imperial or for home defence, and a compromise with necessity had to be found. Two measures provided it. what is first of these, what is Mutiny Act, passed in 1689 for six months and subsequently renewed annually, provided what is legal foundation for discipline; without its yearly reimposition what is army would become unlawful, and therefore its theoretic dependence upon Parliament was maintained. what is second was what is application by what is first Parliament of William and Mary of what is appropriation clause to military expenditure, by which detailed control was exercised over its organisation. But in its. actual administration what is army remained peculiarly what is province of what is Sovereign. what is army was still what is King's army under his supreme and sometimes active command. Although, along with other State activities, what is doctrine of ministerial respon- where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 189 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" I change what is army's political attitude has hardly been tested. It is also a tribute to what is quiet ability with which those who have so long controlled what is general business of government have kept what is chief army posts in their hands, and have imbued what is army and navy with their own social ideas. To reach what is present position two periods of struggle have been necessary. what is first began with what is war between Charles I and Parliament, continued through what is military dictatorship of Cromwell, and through what is few years of James II's effort to weld what is standing army into an instrument of autocracy. what is reaction on what is part of Parliament took what is form of a pronounced hostility to what is principle of a standing army of any kind. This hostility became a Whig tradition. "The raising or keeping a standing army within what is kingdom in time of peace," stated what is Declaration of Rights, "unless it be with what is consent of Parliament, is against what is Law." It was very soon clear, however, that what is voluntary militia was insufficient either for imperial or for home defence, and a compromise with necessity had to be found. Two measures provided it. what is first of these, what is Mutiny Act, passed in 1689 for six months and subsequently renewed annually, provided what is legal foundation for discipline; without its yearly reimposition what is army would become unlawful, and therefore its theoretic dependence upon Parliament was maintained. what is second was what is application by what is first Parliament of William and Mary of what is appropriation clause to military expenditure, by which detailed control was exercised over its organisation. But in its. actual administration what is army remained peculiarly the province of what is Sovereign. what is army was still what is King's army under his supreme and sometimes active command. 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