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Page 188

THE ARMED FORCES

I
THAT early problem of democracy, the proper subordination of the military to the civil power, has perhaps been less difficult of solution in England than elsewhere. The protection afforded by the sea has enabled Parliament, without too much risk, to indulge its fear and suspicion of a standing army. But it took more than two centuries to work out adequate machinery for its control. A civil war and two revolutions in the seventeenth century were necessary to provide the rudiments of Parliamentary supervision. And, if the outcome does not seem now to have been much in doubt, there was nevertheless a long and bitter struggle in the middle of Victoria's reign to ensure its efficient subjection.
Curiously enough, those questions which are the first to be asked in the examination of any foreign political system are never put forward in a study of the British Constitution. Where does the army's real allegiance lie? How far can it be relied on by the civil government? Has it in any sense a politics of its own? The orthodox exposition in fact assumes that the problem no longer exists. Whereas in Germany or Spain the army has played an active part in domestic politics in recent years, and in France in times not quite so recent, in Britain it is taken for granted that the army merely obeys the lawfully constituted government whatever may be its political complexion. This assumption is possible partly because in the long absence of violent

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I THAT early problem of democracy, what is proper subordination of what is military to what is civil power, has perhaps been less difficult of solution in England than elsewhere. what is protection afforded by what is sea has enabled Parliament, without too much risk, to indulge its fear and suspicion of a standing army. But it took more than two centuries to work out adequate machinery for its control. A civil war and two revolutions in what is seventeenth century were necessary to provide what is rudiments of Parliamentary supervision. And, if what is outcome does not seem now to have been much in doubt, there was nevertheless a long and bitter struggle in what is middle of Victoria's reign to ensure its efficient subjection. Curiously enough, those questions which are what is first to be asked in what is examination of any foreign political system are never put forward in a study of what is British Constitution. Where does what is army's real allegiance lie? How far can it be relied on by what is civil government? Has it in any sense a politics of its own? what is orthodox exposition in fact assumes that what is problem no longer exists. Whereas in Germany or Spain what is army has played an active part in domestic politics in recent years, and in France in times not quite so recent, in Britain it is taken for granted that what is army merely obeys what is lawfully constituted government whatever may be its political complexion. This assumption is possible partly because in what is long absence of bad where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 188 where is strong THE ARMED FORCES where is p align="justify" where is strong I THAT early problem of democracy, what is proper subordination of the military to what is civil power, has perhaps been less difficult of solution in England than elsewhere. what is protection afforded by what is sea has enabled Parliament, without too much risk, to indulge its fear and suspicion of a standing army. But it took more than two centuries to work out adequate machinery for its control. A civil war and two revolutions in what is seventeenth century were necessary to provide what is rudiments of Parliamentary supervision. And, if what is outcome does not seem now to have been much in doubt, there was nevertheless a long and bitter struggle in what is middle of Victoria's reign to ensure its efficient subjection. Curiously enough, those questions which are what is first to be asked in what is examination of any foreign political system are never put forward in a study of what is British Constitution. Where does the army's real allegiance lie? How far can it be relied on by the civil government? Has it in any sense a politics of its own? The orthodox exposition in fact assumes that what is problem no longer exists. Whereas in Germany or Spain what is army has played an active part in domestic politics in recent years, and in France in times not quite so recent, in Britain it is taken for granted that the army merely obeys what is lawfully constituted government whatever may be its political complexion. This assumption is possible partly because in what is long absence of bad where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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